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 1 
 on: May 18, 2017, 10:45:01 AM 
Started by DaBotz - Last post by DaBotz
I also added a wireless numeric pad as shortcuts (note: this pad model is somewhat buggy, with keys prone to double-clicking; The MC Saite SK-51AG  that I use with UBiQ 2 is much more reliable).

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With this, I hereby declare the build finished (till the next update).

P.S. I re/confirm that the refresh rate set at 75 hz improves things noticeably.

With the arm, I use a 3.0 mt long VGA cable, that runs along the usb line and the power line.

I noticed that when the pen is retrieved by the tablet, a slight disturb affects the screen.

As I wrote, it is pretty slight, so I am not sure that it was not present even with the shorter cable and and the power and USB going each one its different way. However, if it is cross/talk, it is yet another reason to prefer digital connections over the VGA.



 2 
 on: May 18, 2017, 10:41:52 AM 
Started by DaBotz - Last post by DaBotz
I built  a pivoting arm to hold the thing (yes, I am a wood lover).

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 3 
 on: May 16, 2017, 08:48:19 PM 
Started by lzhets - Last post by lzhets
When i get info about glass, I asked: "Can the glass break when I press it with a ballpoint pen?"
Their answer contain 1 URL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Wir_LGWI6o

1 for ~36$ (without shipping).

If you want, i can generate an order for you.

 4 
 on: May 16, 2017, 05:28:27 PM 
Started by CableMender - Last post by XDjackieXD

take some high-res photos of the right board and one of the 18 input groups

Gladly, but the lighting in my shop is atrocious. I'll haul it upstairs to take some proper pictures before I button it back up, one way or another; I'm also curious what the heck is going on with some of this circuitry.

Can you please clarify what you mean by the "18 input groups"?  Huh

There are 18 identical groups of (most likely) line drivers, preamps and probably either ADCs or multiplexers. the newer wacom boards got this all integrated into one ASIC

 5 
 on: May 16, 2017, 08:03:37 AM 
Started by CableMender - Last post by CableMender
Panel mount power connectors came in and they're a perfect fit. They'd make for one ugly cable, but I can at least test some theories with them. This is suddenly a bit scary, because this will be a major triumph if the Cintiq was all working besides the cable, and I wouldn't want my inexperience to be the thing that fried it. So, in administering this next bit of advice, please treat me as you would an idiotic five-year-old holding his soldering iron upside down - no big words, assume I know absolutely nothing, and be very clear if I'm about to destroy anything.  Grin

DVI cable is a cinch. USB should be easy to solder up (red-to-red, the black pin is definitely connected to the ground plane, etc., and even if someone has funny ideas about the standard color code it's unlikely anything will explode). I don't entirely understand the "why" of this dual-channel power cable, but then I never quite grokked V=IR, either. I do know that the two black pins going into the served cable read as 0 Ohms across, as do the two white pins, the black pins read at 0 to a grounded screw and the white pins read at infinity, and a white to a black reads at infinity. Four pins as a hedge against large amperages, but effectively just one white V-in and a ground, yes?

Plugging the power supply into the connector yields similar results - two pins are common to each other, as are the other two, the two sets are not connected, both sets of pins read at infinity to the left and right prongs of the barrel connector going into the power supply unit, and only one set of pins read as 0 to the third middle (presumably "ground") prong.

So does this mean the repair may be as simple as wiring up the USB line color-to-color, soldering the black common-ground pins out of the Cintiq into the pair of pins that connects to the middle prong of the power supply cable and the whites to the other pair, and slapping in a DVI cable?  Shocked

take some high-res photos of the right board and one of the 18 input groups

Gladly, but the lighting in my shop is atrocious. I'll haul it upstairs to take some proper pictures before I button it back up, one way or another; I'm also curious what the heck is going on with some of this circuitry.

Can you please clarify what you mean by the "18 input groups"?  Huh

 6 
 on: May 13, 2017, 02:18:43 PM 
Started by CableMender - Last post by XDjackieXD
Ertew already told you everything that could be said about the connectors but if you still got it open I'd ask you if you could take some high-res photos of the right board and one of the 18 input groups (so you can read the markings on the chips if there are any). I'm interested how they built this as it doesn't seem to use their usual "all in one" asic you can find in the intuos and penabled lines Smiley

 7 
 on: May 13, 2017, 09:44:01 AM 
Started by CableMender - Last post by Ertew
If this monitor really need 7A of current, industrial equipment (disconnected each service inspection) will use proper service margin and have 2-pin connectors with 10A per pin capacity. Proper engineered user manageable equipment should have bigger safety margin, let say 15A - 20A capacity to have good enough performance even after years of playing with it. But better connectors always cost more and are more tough than regular low-current ones.
IMHO someone decide to use standard connector with 7A/pin or 10A/pin current capacity but connect two pins parallel to double current capacity. Next thing, proper power cable will be thicker and harder than two with half size and half capacity.

Next, USB. You should have 4 pins in this order: GND, D+, D-, 5V and I hope that Wacom obey standards. If not, here are simple instruction:
GND is often connected to shielding. Ohm-meter can easily check this.
GND and 5V are often connected to input capacitor located near connector. Also, polarity mark can approve where are 5V and GND.
D+ and D- often are routed to two similar SMD components or single 4-pin/6-pin input filter. If You swap these two wires, funny things may happened but You cannot destroy anything. If You swap wires again and tablet working better, You're in home.


* one exception, sometimes You may found solution with 2, 4, 6, 8 'big' power wires and extra 2 small wires. This are sense wires. PSU can read voltage directly at load and increase output voltage to compensate voltage drop over long cables.

 8 
 on: May 13, 2017, 05:15:23 AM 
Started by CableMender - Last post by CableMender
Everything arrived, and nothing was quite what I expected.  Cheesy

Screen looks almost pristine, so even when I confirm this thing is offically dead I might be able to part it out. Took the back of the case off and peeled some tape - what's this?



I knew this was possible and it still utterly shocks the armchair engineer in me. If you're going to put a full-size DVI connector head in your product, why the heck wouldn't you just mount it two inches lower and make it accessible to the user?  Huh



Thankfully, it will make testing this thing a relative breeze. The USB connector was as expected, red=V+5/black=GND/green=D-/white=D+ wires that couldn't be any more standard (though please speak up if Wacom has different ideas about what the colors mean). It's the damned power connector that was the most unexpected part:



Two white wires, and two black wires? Why does a power connector need four separate pins in the first place? Is this thing expecting two separate power rails and two separate grounds because of the amperage these things draw? I'm beyond confused here...



Only needing to deal with eight wires is a huge relief. There's hope for this thing yet! Also, I must say, the microelectronic design skills on display here are mighty impressive. I just had an earlier touchscreen monitor open looking for bad caps a few weeks ago, and it was an absolute mess compared to this. Like, what's an electrolytic? Cheesy

So the good news is it looks like all I need is a pinout for the power connector and I might actually be somewhere. Bad news is the DIN connector I ordered was waaay too big for the power adapter. Apparently I need a mini 4-pin DIN, but I strongly suspect the "Philmore EML4" connector I just bought will arrive looking exactly like an S-video connector. I got a 5-pack of these uxcell cheapie panel mounts, as well, but unless I can disassemble one I might be better off just chopping up the power adapter.

the thief that tried to steal it

I honestly hadn't considered it might be stolen, because I have a small amount of experience with the aftermath of equipment liquidation. If you haven't had the pleasure, I assure you this kind of incredibly short-sighted destruction is par for the course. I've never seen it happen in person, but this is how I picture my Cintiq's backstory went:

Quote
INT. OFFICE - DAY

Rustic workmen throw late-model Power Macs across a gutted office in the manner of fishmongers. FOREMAN of these equipment liquidators surveys the scene from behind a clipboard. UNDERLING emerges from under a nearby desk, clearly perplexed.

FOREMAN: An' make sure ya git them monitors on tha cart.

UNDERLING: Uh, boss? They got some kinda cables on 'em...

FOREMAN: (barely looking up) Whatsa problem? Tumbscrews?

UNDERLING: Dang things split off into t'ree, and they got these connectors, and...is that a USB?

FOREMAN: (handing over a pair of bolt cutters) Yeah, yeah. We ain't gettin' paid by the hour here.

UNDERLING: (handing back one of several Intuos4 styluses) There was these pens, too, but they're all outta ink.

FOREMAN: (annoyed) Whaddoes this look like, a recyclin' drive? (throws stylus into large trash can brimming with high-end Logitech mice, mechanical keyboards, various vital brackets and dongles, and large-capacity hard drives)
Grin

Next hurdle, then: Can anyone please explain exactly what's going on with these four pins my DTK-2100 calls a power input, and possibly direct me to a pinout?

 9 
 on: May 12, 2017, 11:29:45 AM 
Started by Switz - Last post by Yoshidaka
I'm sure your message is very good. Get a lot of benefits.

 10 
 on: May 12, 2017, 11:29:14 AM 
Started by Switz - Last post by Yoshidaka
I'm sure your message is very good. Get a lot of benefits.

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