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Author Topic: All you need to know about FFC's (Flat Flexible Cables)  (Read 55924 times)
bernard
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« Reply #45 on: September 27, 2011, 07:48:02 PM »

Yes, it can work, others have done it.

You do not need tape (but it wouldn't hurt). Just a very careful placement of the FFC before closing the "ZIF". Then it should hold tight. If you can, make sure you test connections with a multi-meter or at least make a good visual inspection of the connections.
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buildorbust
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« Reply #46 on: September 28, 2011, 08:33:41 PM »

Yes, it can work, others have done it.

You do not need tape (but it wouldn't hurt). Just a very careful placement of the FFC before closing the "ZIF". Then it should hold tight. If you can, make sure you test connections with a multi-meter or at least make a good visual inspection of the connections.

Just had an idea. If I have 3 FFC's that are too short (but obviously same pitch/pin count) can I tape them tightly together to make an "extension" or with that cause something to blow up or erupt in flames? TIA
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Drewid
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« Reply #47 on: October 20, 2011, 01:48:59 PM »

That'll probably work if you're really precise about it and also fix the joints to something that will stop them flexing. a thin piece of wood or plastic or something.
If it was me I'd be wanting to solder it or at least to get a meter on it to make sure adjacent pins weren't touching.
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buildorbust
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« Reply #48 on: October 20, 2011, 07:36:24 PM »

That'll probably work if you're really precise about it and also fix the joints to something that will stop them flexing. a thin piece of wood or plastic or something.
If it was me I'd be wanting to solder it or at least to get a meter on it to make sure adjacent pins weren't touching.

Yeah, it works, but not very well. Will work for a while until I have to adjust anything and then it's nigh impossible to get it to line up again w/out totally retaping. Talked to a Digikey rep and they were less than useless as regards finding a socket to shove them together into. How complicated would it be to make one of those DIY-Beamer boards manually?
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bernard
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« Reply #49 on: October 21, 2011, 01:58:01 AM »

Taping 3 FFCs together to make an extension?  You better find a single FFC and work with that. I mean those are fairly cheap and easy to find, no?

Making a DIY-beamer extension board manually -- well -- yes -- it *is* possible. But requires some basic equipment. I tried in the past finding parts to do just that (but without a PCB), but had no luck. I was thinking of getting two connectors that one would solder "back-to-back" but could not find anything that would work.  In all cases you needed to build a PCB board.  There are ways to make PCBs at home, but then the high-precision is difficult to achieve. One would need to patch the broken traces anyways. and even if you have a perfect PCB, then you need to solder the connectors -- there isn't much distance between the pins on the board either.   There are tricks out there, but it is not the easiest thing to do I must say.   

There might be ways, just that I had no luck finding it so far. If you have ideas, I am all ears.

I was thinking I could maybe manufacture those boards myself (=invest $$$), but I have no time to do this and given the wide variety of pin count and pitch, it is not a small task (unless one has cheap access to the proper resources and have the proper experience to make these).
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buildorbust
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« Reply #50 on: October 21, 2011, 02:37:20 AM »

Have you tried the toner printing method or is that not precise enough? I saw a few links about that and it looks interesting, but it seems questionable if that would work for .5mm pitch.
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Drewid
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« Reply #51 on: October 21, 2011, 01:34:54 PM »

Lumenlabs folks used to use an ordinary surface mount type connector of the right width, and jam the two cables into it face to face.
Then when they were sure it was working flood it with hot glue or superglue or something .

Not ideal.
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Drewid
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« Reply #52 on: October 21, 2011, 01:43:58 PM »

TP labs do something that could be soldered fairly easily,
http://www.tplabs.info/catalog/ffcfpc-0-5mm-dip-adapter-v2-0-multiple-pins/?gclid=CJDGo5nl-asCFcRO4QodcRHSlQ

BUT not cheap at about £10 per connector and you would need two, also pretty bulky.
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sekopasa
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« Reply #53 on: December 19, 2011, 09:18:10 PM »

can i use a 20pin ffc with an 50pin pcb?

i mean this one,

http://diy-beamer.com/product_info.php?products_id=87&XTCsid=38bb66b6e2f196367e0d60ca13979acd

if i plug the two 20 pin cables as opposite, my logic says there shouldnt be any problem. What do you think?
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bernard
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« Reply #54 on: December 19, 2011, 09:41:12 PM »

Yes, it is possible and some have done it. It can be annoying to align, but definitely possible. You can even help it a little by adding a piece of plastic or whatnot that would "fill" the remaining space and keep your cable straight while actuating the ZIF. Once the ZIF is clamped, it is holds the cable pretty tight.
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lazy_mosquito
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« Reply #55 on: November 29, 2012, 01:00:21 PM »

The ffc -cable for extending the wacom i4 express-keys:

The ffc-cable for connecting the express-keys to the main PCB of the Intuos4 XL is very short. This replacement is 20cm long.

http://be.farnell.com/wurth-elektronik/687718200002/cable-ffc-rev-0-5mm-200mm-18way/dp/1908552

http://katalog.we-online.de/em/datasheet/687706200002.pdf
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viveledefence
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« Reply #56 on: July 21, 2014, 11:32:00 AM »

Repairing Torn FFC's

It's possible to repair a torn FFC with sandpaper and an extension kit. (I've not tried this yet but read it somewhere).

Cut it neatly across.

Stick a bit of insulating tape about 1/4" (5mm) from the cut end. 

Sand "along the grain" gently till you clean off the insulation between the tape and the end. Not too much or you'll remove the tracks as well. 

Gently remove the tape starting from the non-sanded side.

Pictures to follow. (Might take a couple of days)  Roll Eyes

Is this going to be continued? is there another post that discusses FFC repair?
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #57 on: July 21, 2014, 11:40:22 AM »

I doubt that this thread will be continued, but there are other posts about fixing FFCs. Try searching the forums for 'Anisotropic Tape'.
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viveledefence
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« Reply #58 on: July 21, 2014, 11:53:09 AM »

I doubt that this thread will be continued, but there are other posts about fixing FFCs. Try searching the forums for 'Anisotropic Tape'.

I will. Thanks.
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sourpea
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« Reply #59 on: November 11, 2014, 07:33:31 PM »

anyone know of a site that is selling extensions similar to diybeemer ones?
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