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Author Topic: Ever thought of making a wireless DIY cintiq?  (Read 8462 times)
Pilpil
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« on: February 06, 2010, 02:35:38 PM »

I believe all builds I have seen around here need to be connected to pc (LCD DVI, and tablet itself). I've been asking myself if anyone has ever thought of using a wireless tablet and some kind of device to make LCD wireless aswell.

I've seen this and this. I don't understand a word of it, and maybe it would be expensive, but I guess this means is possible. I wonder if this wireless thing would affect jitter.

And for power supply, I remember seeing some kind of external batteries for laptop which worked connected to the power cable.

What do you think? Could it be done?
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random-jimmy
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2010, 01:30:31 PM »

It is definitely possible, but there are a lot of drawbacks that will never be overcome to enable us to build a wireless Cintiq.

First off is the use of wireless: USB (and subsequently WUSB) simply cannot handle the bandwidth for video, forcing the chip to compress the video sent. This results in poorer performance (and higher CPU usage). Secondly, there is the power supply. A 12-cell LiPo battery could drive a normal unmodded monitor for roughly 2 hours (they draw around 40W). Best case scenario (with low-power LCD parts) you may get about 6 - 8 hours.

However, you are now looking at something which weighs in the region of >6kg (plus housing), and can go a maximum of 3-5m away from your computer. When you look at all of it, it is better just to either move your computer under your coffee table (and use 5m cords so you can lounge in comfort).

Another option is something like the iTab (wei's build) - something which I am looking at replicating and improving upon - these are essentially a whole laptop built into the Cintiq. This means true portability: you can take it anywhere. However, battery life still sucks because you now have the whole computer to power off a battery.
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Drewid
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2010, 02:45:20 PM »

I've been wondering if my little AspireOne would have enough power to do basic sketching on an external monitor.
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random-jimmy
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2010, 11:48:14 AM »

It probably would have enough power - I have my laptop processor underclocked to 0.8GHz per core (dual core), and it manages large-ish photoshop files pretty well, so it would stand to reason that the AspireOne would be able to do some basic drawing up to around 3000x2000 pixels.

The only problem would be graphics: as long as the external screen isn't a high resolution, it should be fine. The maximum resolution I would use is 1280x800 if you intend to have the Aspire's internal screen on as well, or possibly 1680x1050 if you are using only the external screen.
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bernard
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« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2010, 11:39:54 PM »

The AspireOne [which model do you have?] is an Intel Atom-based system.

How do these little CPU beast perform anyway?  Are there comparisons with more traditional laptop/desktop processors?
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Drewid
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« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2010, 12:03:16 AM »

It's an a150,   I can't say I've stress tested it.   It feels the same as my previous laptop for browsing and typing, but that's hardly taxing.  I do like the keyboard though,  I tried various notebooks and only the Aspire and the Samsung NS10 didn't feel really cramped. 
 
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random-jimmy
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2010, 06:46:32 AM »

Again, sorry for late replies, having just started uni and become snowed under with work Sad

I think the atom 1.6GHz chips are about equal to a Pentium M 2GHz - still more than enough for everyday work and even photoshop (I run a dual core processor underclocked down to 0.8GHz per core and have no issues, except when running filters on gigapixel images)
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Wence
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« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2010, 05:54:09 PM »

Ha ha, I had to throw in a bone for the AspireOne. I used one (an AOD250) until two weeks ago for literally everything. I was running Photoshop, Sketchbook Pro, and all sorts of other things on it - I had to optimize Windows 7 a bit, but it worked very well for me. And even when I was using an external monitor I would get at least four hours of battery life from my 6 cell battery. I had to start doing 3D CAD, though, so I ended up having to upgrade to a more powerful computer. I miss my Acer  :'(
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