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Author Topic: Now that LED is within reach  (Read 3153 times)
titus1972
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« on: March 17, 2010, 07:16:29 PM »

Hey I just wanted group thoughts on this idea. Now that LED LCD monitors are so much more reasonable: eg.- www.maginnovision.com. (they are down this week) But here is one for a reasonable price : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824191011&nm_mc=OTC-RSS 169 + free shipping is not bad.

The reason I wish to go this way is because I wish to reduce to heat (significantly) and as well as to give myself the best chance of generating a clean trackable field for my pen.

One other thing I wish to investigate is whether these DIY setups are sacrificing to much in the way of trackable space above the screen, that magical space, where the tablet tracks the pen 1 cm or 2 above. This led unit and others boast a new ultra thin screen. eg. below. The Mag above boasts a 2.2 cm thickness see this page for specs and pics: http://www.bestdirect.ca/products/224888/MAG/GML2226/

Look how thin and compact the guts are on this unit. So my question is this I could take a normal LCD and convert it ( I even have a few good ideas about using led strip lighting seen here: http://www.ecolightled.com/category/led_strip_light_tape but nothing is in stone or I could just buy a unit like this LED ready LCD. Will the this new unit be problematic to incorporate into this project or do you think converting a traditional LCD would the way to go?

I'm torn not because it will be to expensive for the new LED LCD but I am afraid I will get it apart (imploding the three year warranty) and finding out this LED tech is not going to play nice with the Wacom bits. What it the right course of action... This one is going to be an important choice. Help would be welcome
« Last Edit: March 17, 2010, 10:57:50 PM by titus1972 » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2010, 02:30:10 AM »

Thickness: The slimness of the monitor case does not tell you how thick is the LCD panel component inside.  On any laptop, the lcd panel is about 4-5 mm thick - and that includes the CCFL. In a monitor, the LCD panel can be the same panel as a laptop or a bigger one -- and yes, the backlight-related stuff is what makes the difference.  Most of the lcd panels we saw had the CCFL on the side (some are in the back and they are the thickest -- btw some LED monitors uses an array of leds in the back which is not that thin.).   Sometimes there were two CCFL per side -- so those (I suspect) are thicker.

Quote
Look how thin and compact the guts are on this unit
Are you saying that we are seeing the internal components somewhere?  It does have a small(!) external power supply -- which is quite nice. Absolutely no AC nor high voltage inside.

Leds: I would imagine that using LEDs is a good thing. Although LEDs are also driven at a certain frequency too -- if this frequency happens to interfere with the wacom sensor, then that's no cool -- but it is nowhere near the same type of high-voltage you see for CCFL. I know higher voltage can cause "arcs" (sparks) so I would imagine it would also produce bigger fields (but that's a wild guess). 

Heat: High-intensity LEDs does produce heat too, but probably much less than CCFLs with their power inverter board.

So, in short, yes, I would say LED-based is probably a good bet, but it is still gambling. You know you won't have the hassle of building your own backlight LED system. I see no extra reason why you couldn't use it for a DIY Cintiq more than a CCFL based system. 

The only real risk here is getting something without knowing about the inner components. The fact that it is CCFL or LED does not change much. What happen if you break it? (You wouldn't be the first one).

Note: You can try TFT-central, if you are lucky, it may give you the model of the LCD Panel component inside.

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titus1972
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2010, 02:50:03 AM »

Oh man yea this is all very true but this is suppose make my decision easier, or at least I hoped  it would ...now I don't know maybe just a used 21" btw I am look at a screen (active area) 18.6 x 11.4 it sells as a 22" but I was hoping it would just fit my intuos2 what do you think will it squeeze in with no complications?
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Drewid
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« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2010, 08:03:13 AM »

Some LED monitors have a large array of LEDs behind the screen.  I would imagine this would cause lots of potential build problems with thickness and interference.
I would guess that something in this price range would just use the LEDs to replace the existing CFLs, so that would be make a good build.

Is there anywhere you can get to see a schematic online for this puppy?
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titus1972
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2010, 05:43:06 PM »

I could not find one anywhere so I think I will just go with the standard unit. I can always convert with those pre-made led strips and make them with almost 0 spacing so I think the even light problem can be nullified.
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