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Author Topic: Is this possible: Non-warranty-voiding DIY case...  (Read 5842 times)
wolvenmoon
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« on: August 08, 2010, 10:21:00 PM »

For: Intuos4 large

What I want: Non-invasive casing to hold intuos4 large and controller and hold monitor directly above intuos4. Preferably the intuos4 would be removeable from the casing and easily put back in.

Price limit: $100 for the case itself.

Desired material: Something that won't break if it's knocked around a bit or I lean on it. Something I can later add a prop onto the back. ( What's it called? The part that you fold out behind a picture and it holds the frame up? )

Tools available: Dremmel ( My skill: 1 star out of 10 ) Jigsaw ( 0 out of 10, it's NIB ) and power drill ( 5 / 10 ) as well as just about any hand tool ever made, to be fair I am an alpha geek who will read guides and jump in. I figured out how to use a soldering iron without any help and without burning myself or breaking anything, heh heh. I potentially have access to some big guns.

Parts I have on hand: I am nearly as equipped as any privately owned computer repair shop, and then some.


What I don't know: How to plan for an unknown monitor/controller kit in the enclosure or if I should have the monitor and etc before I have the enclosure, what material I should be looking at in my price range, and if this is even a possibility.




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bernard
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2010, 02:10:30 AM »

Of course "the monitor on top of it" -- is not a monitor but really an unfolded LCD Panel component.

For the case -- let's be creative here...  hum, wood is the first thing that come to mind, but you said you have stuff like a PC repair shop?  Well, maybe you could re-use some of the dead PC casing or panels. You can punch holes with your Dremel and use metal-self-threading screws to hold panels
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bernard
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2010, 02:31:42 AM »

you can pre-design something before getting the parts (for the fun of it!!), but I wouldn't spend any dollar before getting the parts and seeing them working correctly. 

Note: the metal is of course electrically conductive.  You could use motherboard "posts" to hold boards at a safe distance.

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wolvenmoon
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2010, 02:49:41 AM »

I've thought of attempting to reuse some of the older PC cases, but I'd have to have something that can shape the metal. I can cut it with the dremmel but I can't weld it/etc.

I'd need some of the 90 degree L brackets and some stuff that can bend metal at precise angles. I have very little tool savvy outside of my field due to a lack of access - the garage is completely trashed, but if I was able to flex the metal and securely get it to stick together I'd be good.

Painting it might get dicey.

I think that other monitor I have is going to be a practice run, I'm going to make a casing for it...


Are you saying I should have the panel/controller/etc before I tackle building the case?
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GwenLP
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2010, 04:37:08 PM »

Quote
Are you saying I should have the panel/controller/etc before I tackle building the case?

Well, to me, this is certainly better this way round...
I don't see the point of making a nice box, only to notice that the parts are either malfunctioning or too big to fit
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wolvenmoon
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2010, 06:35:25 PM »

Yes, it does sound smart, but it's so expensive! *Cry emote here*

Is 1280x800 really the resolution I want to use or can the tablet take advantage of a higher resolution screen?
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bernard
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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2010, 08:33:22 PM »

Even the oldest Wacom tablets resolution were really high. No LCD that I know of can match it.

You have a Intuos 4 -- That's the best Wacom tablet resolution available (I think).  LCD are like in the hundreds of DPIs -- Wacom tablets are in the thousands DPI!

So if you can find a LCD with a better resolution (within the price range you want) -- then the better of course.

--------

Other than the metal -- have you look at Styrofoam?  Might get a bit bulky, but hey, it would work!  You could re-enforce critical parts with strips of PC casing material -- a lot of pieces to hold the floppy drives are already folded to 90 degrees (actually the drive casing itself is made of lighter metal, easier to bend). Cut pieces out of it.  There are tons of ways to build a case. You could even recycle the plastic sides of broken (but sometimes huge!) CRT TVs.   Look around. Go to your local recycling depot, you might find stuff there too!  No limit here to creativity!

And of course, there's always the good old Duct Tape - they now sell in all colors. (watch out that these tend to be electrically conductive, don't put directly on PCBs).
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wolvenmoon
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2010, 09:20:16 PM »

If I can get my carpal/cubital tunnel syndrome fixed I might try something completely insane, I.E. trying to do a homebrewed plastic mold.

I think I have a doctor friend that has a homebrew one, next time I see him I'll as him.

But otherwise, I need it to be functioning with no sharp corners, so mass recycling floppy drive cases is probably out of the question. ( Dimensions would be really hard ) and since styrofoam gives off noxious fumes when heated and is an insulator I don't want to use it in a case I expect to heat up.

I'm curious as to if there's a really tolerant plastic that'd form to shape just by waving a heatgun at it.

I'm not equipped to do precision metal cutting, though. I have tin snips and cheap ones at that. I use them as wire cutters, or did, they have trouble with that now-a-days.

So I should be looking at as high a resolution as I can afford? Will higher resolutions increase interference?
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bernard
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2010, 09:25:48 PM »

Anything with plastic == fumes too.

interference:  Not clear.  We have no evidence of one over the other.  Only the more recent widescreen (newer generation) seem to be better at interference. (DonShole's TabletMod.com seem to imply that there is little interference with the parts he plays with).
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bernard
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2010, 09:27:26 PM »

someone looked at carbon fiber kits -- (but these are not the cheapest and you still need some sort of mold)
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wolvenmoon
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« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2010, 12:38:51 AM »

I saw that thread. I'm right at doing a practice run at making a case for this old 15 inch square screen I have and seeing if I'm completely out of my league or if this is something I can do.
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bernard
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« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2010, 02:13:58 AM »

don't forget that it is actually fun!   Grin
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wolvenmoon
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« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2010, 08:02:24 PM »

Yep!
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