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Author Topic: Antiq (penabled)  (Read 17294 times)
UnderSampled
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« on: August 25, 2010, 02:04:57 AM »

The Antiq (pronounced like "antique") is a 14.1" screen tablet with original penabled digitizer. Both the screen and the digitizer were taken directly from a dead Toshiba Tecra M7 convertible TabletPC. It is the first of it's kind in that regard (As far as I know). See http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?topic=1659.0 for the adventure of getting it to work.



Specifications:

LCD module (14.1 TFT):

Item: CHIMEI G33C0003B110 (WXGA+)
Number of Dots: 1,440 (W) x 900 (H)
Dot spacing (mm): 0.21075(H) x 0.21075(V)
Display range (mm): 303.48(H) x 189.675(V)
Outline dimensions: 319.5(W) x 205.5(H) x 7.5Max(D)

Tablet:

Item: WACOM SU-14W06E-01X
Resolution: 30,348 (X) x 18968 (Y)
Tilt capabilities: none



I am close to purchasing a LCD LVDS Controller kit (driver, inverter, and power supply) from nyjtouch for a total of about $50, shipping included ($27.99 for controller/inverter + $9.99 shipping + $6 for power supply + $4 additional shipping (power supplies can be heavy) ). I think this is a good deal for what's required to get the monitor working. Would you agree?

I'm not quite sure what the case should be like, but for sure it will be one of the thinnest, least bezel-ed 'tiqs around, because of it's laptop origins.

Here's Hoping.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2010, 05:32:14 AM by UnderSampled » Logged

Wilcorp70
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2010, 05:11:46 AM »

You finally got all the driver issues worked out!!???  As for the case, why not just reuse the screen housing of the Tecra?
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UnderSampled
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2010, 02:39:19 PM »

No, the driver issues are not fully worked out, but I trust enough that it will at least work in linux. Regardless, $50 is cheap for a monitor, and I can always do a normal DIY Cintiq if I can't get it working. I could use the housing from the laptop, and It's still quite possible, but there is an unfortunate 8cm long hole in the bottom of it, and also a hole where the fingerprint reader goes. Perhaps I can work around/with those.
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UnderSampled
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« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2010, 04:41:48 PM »

Ok, the drivers are now worked out enough that the next, most notable step will be to get the display working.

Here is a video of the screenTablet working with the screen powered off (I don't have a controller yet):
http://vimeo.com/15053360

Now I re-pose my question from before: Is $27.99 for controller/inverter + $9.99 shipping + $6 for power supply + $4 additional shipping a good price?
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bernard
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2010, 02:03:42 AM »

This is one of the best price around -- hey not that long ago we were talking 350$US base price just for one of the board.

I must have missed something, that 6$ power supply is not included with the controller?

Get paranoid a little and properly check with the supplier that they do the right programming for your LCD -- just for the kick, repeat them the base specification (native resolution, 6 bit/8 bit colors, 30 pin/20 pin connections, number of CCFL lamps connection etc.) -- one member just got a bad experience -- they programmed a completely different resolution -- a widescreen one(!) for his 4:3 panel. Non sense.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 02:08:24 AM by bernard » Logged
UnderSampled
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« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2010, 11:17:44 PM »

I'm Back! And a long time coming at that.

This project really is quite near complete, even though it hasn't progressed much since I last reported. The main reason I haven't been working on this project much is that my computer currently cannot support a third monitor. I do hope to upgrade to a system that can in around a year.

Anyway, Here is the main thing that's happened:


* Picture 9.jpg (38.85 KB. 640x480 - viewed 977 times.)


Correct. The LCD driver arrived. In fact, it works perfectly (and yes, it has DVI support). The only problem is I don't know what to do with the inverter. When I asked for output specifications, I was given information on the input into the inverter. Does anyone know what the output of the inverter is? My voltmeter doesn't go high enough in AC volts to measure anything. The inverter from the original laptop specifies 750acv at 5/7 W/VA and 6.00mA. Also, the FL strip on the monitor has a keyed connector (one of the wires is pink, with a thinker whole in the plastic part), while the NJYtouch inverter's plastic connector is evenly spaced.

In addition to this advancement, I also purchased another tablet pen in hopes of making a custom wood-turned housing for it. The specific pen I purchased was the AXT-MB100-0S01 "modbook" pen you can find on Ebay.



it has a second sideswitch which was another reason I chose to get another pen (also, the relatively cheap price-$15-was a factor). Unfortunately it seems that the additional sideswitch only registers as an eraser when pressed, so I either have to live with it that way, or find a way to test which way is up on the pen (if the tip is down, it's the second button, but it the eraser is down, then it's the eraser). If anyone has any ideas on how to do this, that would be awesome.
Regardless, I would like to open it up to put inside a wooden pen. I vaguely remember that someone here took apart a similar pen, bot I couldn't re-find that thread. Does anyone know where that was?

Cheers!

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bernard
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« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2010, 02:09:02 AM »

Welcome back Undersampled!

Kudos finding that: That is a very good price for a "new" pen!  with a *duo side switch* on top.  Smiley
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UnderSampled
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« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2010, 01:25:42 AM »

So... Does anyone know the answers too my questions? It's OK if not, it'd Just be nice to know. Thanks!
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bernard
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« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2010, 03:09:14 AM »

All that inverter/CCFL business is quite special. I have a few piece of information but there are big "holes" in my knowledge.

- The inverter voltage output should "match" the CCFL lamps they say in the LCD datasheets. 
- When we order a LVDS driver -- there is always an inverter in there. So that tells me that the voltage seems to be pretty "standard"ized.
- There are indeed big variations on voltages (I *think* it can vary from 500V AC to over 1kV AC) - but I do not know the odds of getting one type over the other.

- The wires (pink, white, etc.) are the standard wires for the CCFL -- they carry high voltage -- high voltage can "arc" -- the connector is specially done to reduce chances of "arcing" -- you can see all the care they took even from the PCB itself (sometimes they even put special holes in the PCB to physically separate the signals near the connector. Also they often put some sort of white "silicone" that -- I assume -- is also to reduce the chances of short circuits and arcs (not sure). 
- Sometimes the two wires are not of the same size. I am not sure why.
- Some bongofishers here have been saying that we should not put a soldering in the middle of the wire, but near the edge instead (if not replacing it completely) --  if you want to extend the wires, get new wires (with the appropriate gauge and sleeve protection) and cut the original wire short.
- There are a few types of connectors -- but one type (beige) seems to be extremely popular.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 10:19:45 AM by bernard » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2010, 03:12:27 AM »

Pen with a wood-turning housing?  That's cool!  Smiley Have you done that before? -- I got a crash course a few months ago from a guy that does a lot of these -- he also explains the products he uses so the wood gets real hard yet not sticky for the fingers. Anyway. 
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luxeomni
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2010, 09:27:07 PM »

Also interested in this re-housing thing of the pen !!
any new infos ? Wink
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tpope
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« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2011, 09:30:11 PM »

it has a second sideswitch which was another reason I chose to get another pen (also, the relatively cheap price-$15-was a factor). Unfortunately it seems that the additional sideswitch only registers as an eraser when pressed, so I either have to live with it that way, or find a way to test which way is up on the pen (if the tip is down, it's the second button, but it the eraser is down, then it's the eraser). If anyone has any ideas on how to do this, that would be awesome.
Regardless, I would like to open it up to put inside a wooden pen. I vaguely remember that someone here took apart a similar pen, bot I couldn't re-find that thread. Does anyone know where that was?

So I've yet to see a Penabled pen (and I've used about a dozen of them) that had the second switch mapped as an eraser in hardware.  However, I recall at least once it being set that way in software.  I'd check the Wacom Tablet control panel and see if you can change it.  The latest drivers are pretty reasonable when it comes to mapping that button.

As for disassembly, the housing looks a lot like the ASUS one I cracked open the other day.  If true, that should mean that there are two separate circuit boards, one fro the pen+switches in front and one for the eraser in back.  They both use the same kind of coil, but a slightly different way of interacting with the coil (the eraser cap has a magnet ring inside that that's what reads pressure, as opposed to the pen tip which has a spring mount I think down inside the coil where the base of the nib sits.

If this is true for the Axiotron model (and I can't see why it wouldn't be) then it should be safe to crack at the seam between the two parts.  The eraser board isn't more than 1.5" long, and not glued in, just held in place by a cap inside where hte two ends meet.

[Updated] I've attached an image of the ASUS pen I disassembled.  The eraser board is inside Frankenstylus so I can't take a photo of that, but this shows the relative lengths and the pen board.  Note that the Axiotron will have a second button.  That plastic endcap at the end of the board is what held it snugly in place.  Imagine two boards inside two tubes, connected by a glued in smaller tube.  That smaller tube is what kept the two firmly in place, and is what you need to break to get this apart. 

Also, before you try to slide out the front board, you're going to want to carefully pry out the button, because that'll catch on the coils otherwise.  It's just friction fit into a little divot in the center.


* penabled-anatomy.jpg (48.42 KB, 400x526 - viewed 1494 times.)
« Last Edit: January 28, 2011, 09:47:16 PM by tpope » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2011, 09:34:18 PM »

If you want stuff remapped and you have a serial board -- it will be feasible with my (slowly upcoming) teensy-based device.

For USB tablets, that's another story. What I would like to know is how to "hijack" USB packets and modify them on the fly as well (to remap the screen for a few DIY Cintiq purposes) -- but still not sure how to do that. I asked in a few USB developer forums, but no easy answer so far.
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tpope
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« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2011, 12:55:28 AM »

I just picked up my own Axiotron pen from that same supplier (down to $10 on eBay) because besides being a really nice pen (I might have to get another one, just for a spare) you can pay more than that just for the nibs from Wacom.

I can confirm that the problems you were having on the second button are in software.  On my TabletPC the second button works as whatever I configure in the tablet driver.  Now, I havent' read the whoel thread on how you've gotten the tablet driver working in the first place, so the problem may be less in a misconfiguration of the Wacom driver and more in whatever custom software you're using, but at least now you know it's possible to get that button working as something other than the eraser.
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bernard
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« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2011, 03:05:52 AM »

The story about the second side-switch and eraser:

For penenabled and UD board, *if* you press and hold the second-side switch while the pen is completely away from the tablet, and you approach the pen (while holding that switch down) -- then most likely it will register as an eraser.  The tablet cannot tell the difference -- it is the way it is. It was a hack to allow an extra switch. (rare those that would normally bring the pen in proximity while holding this button).  If you press the button afterwards, the tablet (the driver on the PC actually) remembered that it was not pressed when coming in proximity so it can't be the eraser, it must be the second switch.

I know this because I had to code that special logic in WaxBee.

Maybe undersampled saw that while doing his little piece of code to drive the pen?
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