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Author Topic: Parts Questions  (Read 3180 times)
whohuh
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« on: December 19, 2010, 08:59:31 PM »

Hi all,

I've been reading around the boards for awhile about some of the things you basically need to make a diy cintiq

1x tablet
1x lcd
1x lcd controller kit
1x custom case
am I missing something?

Seems like a pretty simple setup so far. I'm planning to recycle my old intuos 3 (6x9in) for this project. So I'll need a 10.4 inch lcd monitor but regarding the controller kit, does it have to be made specifically for my lcd brand or can I just use a generic one? I was thinking of this one: http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-LCD-CONTROLLER-KIT-8-9-LCD-LED-BACK-LIGHT-/180539369325?pt=Computer_Monitors&hash=item2a08fc276d I don't plan on using the screen since its too small and I've heard you can run into some problems with a led display. But is it possible to use this with a 10.4 inch laptop screen (I noticed the compatible brands are hannstar,lg,etc so I'll be using one of those)? Perhaps my real question is, how do you determine if an lcd can be used with a lcd controller kit?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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bernard
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2010, 07:36:39 AM »

Unless you want to pay 300$US+ LCD controller kits are never really "generic". Read the following: http://wiki.bongofish.co.uk/doku.php?id=bongofish:lvdsvendors

You can problably run into more problems with non-LED LCDs (because of the jitter).

Having a combo LCD + controller kit that is known to work is at least one less thing to worry.

About your question : To determine if it "works" -- well -- it probably don't -- unless you can reprogram it and you have the ability to create a custom cable -- and we are not talking the average DB-9 connector here, but 0.5mm pitch, 20..30 pins surface-mount connectors.  Grin But if you really want to know, you have to get the datasheet for your LCD Panel. (which explains the ins and outs of the LCD Panels -- that includes the LVDS "connector" and all that stuff) and match all the little details with your LCD Panel.

About LED Backlight:  What type of problems have you heard you could run into??
« Last Edit: December 20, 2010, 07:38:49 AM by bernard » Logged
whohuh
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2010, 07:55:57 AM »

I was reading around that led can get pretty hot and burn out quicker than lcds, but perhaps I may have had some a miscommunication?

Thanks for replying, it looks like my safest bet is to just strip a monitor and buy a tablet that fits that size, it looks like it'll be cheaper and my work area will be larger than the current intuos I have
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bernard
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2010, 09:21:06 AM »

AFAIK, LEDs (as in LEDs used as LCD backlight) can indeed get pretty hot -- but CCFLs (and its inverter circuit) runs quite hot too.  CCFLs are lamps and have limited time -- LEDs have longer life (normally).  With intense heat, electronics degrage more quickly in general. So keep it cool and it will run (much) longer.

Quote
led can get pretty hot and burn out quicker than lcds

Some big brand names tries to distinguish the LED screens by calling the "old" generation "LCD".  So you would often see people talking "LED vs. LCD" -- well -- it does not make sense since -- in most cases for computers and TV screens -- it is an LCD! The only difference is the backlight is being done using LEDs instead of fluorescent light(s).
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2011, 09:48:54 PM »

Sorry if I'm hijacking this thread but I can't create posts yet it seems ;p

Anyways, after lurking on this board all night yesterday (who needs sleep?) and researching everywhere else I might just be super lucky today! After calling one of the first craigslist postings I found I think I'll be picking up a UD-1212-R with power supply and pen for $15, only it's a 45 min drive away ;p I think it's such a great price that I feel guilty. Seller hasn't used it in a few years but said it was working last he used it and it's been in storage since. Should I be wary at all? (I'm not!)

Second, I think I can get a 15" 4:3 LCD from a friend for cheap(or free). I think all I really am looking for is a Keyspan USB-Serial adapter + LVDS controller right? I'm a little technical but not completely solid on LCDs so please enlighten me if I'm missing anything vital.

A few questions tho:
Will a 1024x768 display be a problem for someone who intends to digitally paint a lot? How do you guys feel about this? Normally I paint on 1900x1200 and I plan to work at 600dpi print resolutions before resizing.

Thanks everyone for any replies and for your already extensive board for research!
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bernard
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2011, 10:08:06 AM »

"digitally paint a lot" -- well not sure what that means exactly.  For pure 2D art, it is probably fine. Lots of people are perfectly happy with this resolution. For CAD-style stuff like 3D modeling it may not be sufficient.  Just try it for yourself (resize your desktop or confine your windows to an area of that size), it also depends if this is your primary monitor or not.  You could have second tablet (that uses compatible pens) to jump to your first monitor to pick tools or whatever. 

"work on 600dpi print resolution" -- well, that depends again on what your want to do on the cintiq -- to look at each pixels of a 600dpi image, you need -- well -- 600 pixels just for one inch!!  Probably no screen display can show you all the pixels for a decent sized pictures (6+ inches). 

You have to judge your needs and what you think is better. The best is to "try it" I think.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2011, 04:42:40 AM by bernard » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2011, 08:17:59 PM »

Haha I suppose you're right. Thanks for the quick reply too.

I mainly just brought up dpi because I find that tablet drawing/painting is best in programs at close to the actual resolution as possible (jitter on regular tablets, let alone a DIY). I just wonder if I'll be stuck to painting only tiny portions at once. Unfortunately it seems like I'll have to wait to test everything because the lvds vendors are still celebrating Chinese New Year.

I plan to do most of my Solidworks/3dsmax work with a regular mouse on a secondary display probably ;p So that shouldn't be a problem. Zbrush however is probably best with a tablet so I'll let you guys know my opinion after I do this build.

I might be RPing the enclosure for my setup, I have access to an 18x18x18 RP tray machine and want to ask if anyone knows if I should end up using a shielded paint on it or if it won't be necessary or if I could just use foil lol. I've never had to deal with shielding before ;p
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