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Author Topic: Converting Wacom UD-0608-R from Serial to USB  (Read 21083 times)
ArtC
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« on: June 23, 2011, 05:44:24 AM »

Will try to convert my UD-0608-R board to USB

*** this mod is in progress, we will summary the mod after we are done ***
« Last Edit: June 27, 2011, 06:16:24 AM by bernard » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2011, 05:46:11 AM »

Hey here are the images Bernard the realterm does not work on 64bit win and putty cant read the serial port maybe the virtual port is the reason ill figure it out somehow all it says is digitizer Ii and the voltage on the bottom I looked all over inside the only sticker i found inside was a barcode (sen-a091) this is below the sen number (6lwc03311) and one other (0070033) and one is (d160k6)

EDIT: Got Putty to find the version its version 1.4-4 thank you!! I am so excited those things look small though this may sound silly to you but where do I find an iron that small?......I have never soldered anything of that magnitude...and what type of solder? I already have some good no clean lead free flux and one last question the copper tape plugging very specific holes if some of the adhesive is coming off how do I put it back I am assuming those holes are covered with special tape for a reason?


* UD_0608_R_IMG01_SERIAL_OUT.JPG (159.74 KB, 1148x799 - viewed 752 times.)

* UD_0608_R_IMG2_SERIAL_PINOUT.JPG (496.4 KB, 910x1366 - viewed 749 times.)

* UD_0608_R_IMG3_CONTROLLER.JPG (409.56 KB, 1065x1065 - viewed 680 times.)

* UD_0608_R_IMG4_CONTROLLER.JPG (223.04 KB, 1344x954 - viewed 587 times.)

* UD_0608_R_IMG5_CONTROLLER.JPG (437.96 KB, 1219x854 - viewed 585 times.)

* UD_0608_R_IMG6_MC145406.JPG (427.41 KB, 1115x782 - viewed 605 times.)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 10:13:25 AM by ArtC » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2011, 09:33:51 AM »

Here are two full board images one a little bigger than the other I think they are close but you would know way better than I....I tried to take the nasty light out of the one but photoshop is my tool and with it not working correctly right now i had to default to an inferior editing tool


* UD_0608_R_FULLIMAGE_NOFLASH.jpg (461.22 KB, 2252x1632 - viewed 819 times.)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 10:12:52 AM by ArtC » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2011, 02:06:41 PM »

Taking a photo of a PCB is really hard.  The best was to go in a very well lit area (like outside during the day) and not use any flash (difficult when doing this at night).
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ArtC
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2011, 08:08:04 PM »

Also difficult to do when you live in oregon....lol...its always real grey here I'll take some more.
The second one I thought had lots of detail as it is the biggest possible image I could upload. So one more outside I am on it!
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 08:10:40 PM by ArtC » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2011, 10:51:55 PM »

Ok much better image Bernard. Lower quality a little but much much bigger...PS Let me know if you see the ROM version there, I had to use a terminal emulator to find out what version it was, sorta like realterm but able to be used on 64bit windows. I did not realize how terrible those images were until I saaw this one.....Well learning thats good


* UD_0608_R_FULLIMAGE_NOFLASH.jpg (461.22 KB, 2252x1632 - viewed 810 times.)
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 10:55:36 PM by ArtC » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2011, 04:37:43 AM »

Cloudy-grey is actually perfect for doing PCB shots (unless it rains! Cheesy).  It is evenly diffused which is exactly what we want.

EDIT: Realterm works fine on my Windows 7, 64 bits.

What is SW101 at the top?  Is this a switch?

The 5V injection point is easy to find:  it is the "bottom" leg of the 5V regulator.   To make a test, you do not need to cut the leg. I cut the leg in the mod because I figured it is safer and probably more "valid" electronically. But it works perfectly without cutting -- at least good enough for a test.

For the serial signals, there is a good chance the same pin numbers do the same, but it is not necessarily true. They might have been shuffled. To ensure they are the same, we need to use a continuity tester. We need to do a little mapping of the pins from the DB9 connector going to a PC up to the MC145406 chip. This is the only way to be 100% sure of what we are doing.  In theory, it should resemble the mapping of the UD-1212-R, but this is a totally different board even if from the same series.

There is no sticker with a ROM version, this type of sticker is big (~1/2 inch square) and immediately visible. I do not know where the ROM is programmed exactly on that board  (maybe IC02).  It does not really matter now that we know your version is 1.4.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 10:38:46 PM by bernard » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2011, 06:42:49 AM »

Yes sir that is the on off switch for the tablet. so when I am testing I am looking for changes in the resistance when the tablet is receiving input correct? Also what is the range of resistance on something like this what range of ohms should my meter be on, and if you do not mind, just a quick little explanation of which pins I should be testing since the boards are entirely different and I have never worked with a circuit board like this, in the automotive industry we check for resistance range which changes the signal of a sensor and the like, such as when you press the accelerator pedal the resistance gets higher or lower which is how the computer tells what percentage of pedal that you are pressing and therefore knows what stage the throttle is in, is this how the pressure sensitivity works on the tablet? Also there are sensors such as the coolant temp sensor that has three wires one for power, one for ground and one is the signal wire that is 5v and the signal varies depending on the temp of the sensor, I am trying my best to learn here as electronics was one of the tougher things for me in my previous profession.   Huh  One last question are you emulating the intuos when we flash the ROM on these?
« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 07:27:55 AM by ArtC » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2011, 02:49:01 PM »

lol  Smiley 

We are not testing while getting input and not really testing the "resistance" either (althought technically this is what a continuity tester does in a way).

It is much simpler than that.  Smiley

The only test I would want you to do now is to perform "continuity tests".  That is:  Between the pins of the MC145406 chip and the pins of the DB9 connector.  The DB9 connector is the serial port connector (9 pins) that is meant to connect to the computer -- the one at the end of the cable.  This has to be done while the board is not powered.  The way I do this is that I use a little bit of wire that I insert in one of the hole of the DB9 connector while knowing which pin number it is (DB9 connectors, often you have the pin number written on the connector, if not then just look at the markings on the PCB, you have a nice diagram with the pin number in the middle of the board! Thanks Wacom!  Grin). I attach one of the probe to that wire and then I slowly "scan" the pins on the chip to discover which one is connected to it (if any).  The most important ones are Pin 2 and Pin 3 but you have to look for the others as well.

http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1930.0;attach=4436;image

In the end, we need to build what I call a "mapping table" -- or which pin is connected to which.  I did that for the UD-1212-R already. The hope is that the mapping is the same for the UD-0608-R.
I want you to build a "table" similar to the "Table 1" in the following post. (But not ALL the columns, just two columns:  the PC-DB9 column and the MC145406 - (RS side) column). And there is a good chance the numbers are going to be exactly the same.

http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?topic=1930.msg14217#msg14217

Pin numbers for your MC145406:

* UD_0608_R_MC145406_pinout.jpg (283.17 KB. 529x499 - viewed 670 times.)



A Continuity Tester often has a "beeper" associated with it, so if you touch the probes to connect them, it beeps.

Emulation: We are not going to flash the "ROM" of the UD-0608-R board (we do not have tools to do that anyways). We are going to flash the ROM on the Teensy and the "teensy" is going to be turned into one of the USB tablet. The one that is being emulated is an Intuos2 12x18 (XD-1218-U) (We can also do a Graphire 3, but that one is too small and is missing features like tilt).


« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 03:11:11 PM by bernard » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2011, 08:56:19 PM »

Ok well continuity thats an easy one there....... Smiley  Next up will it be necessary for me to get a new pen in order for the board to work correctly, an Intuos pen? I have several of the original pens but not sure if they will work here.
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bernard
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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2011, 11:57:41 PM »

The original pen or any one that works with this UD board is fine -- nothing changes here -- any of the penabled or ultrapad pen should work like before. You have to understand that we are not really changing the nature of the board -- we are only "interfacing" it (talking to it) on one side and then emulating a USB device on the other side.  This board will not "really" become an intuos! Smiley (just faking it)

« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 05:50:44 AM by bernard » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2011, 09:35:15 AM »

Here is the pinout from the MC145406 I believe it is the same, but I may have missed something. One final question, now this probably makes no sense and I do understand we are only pretending to be another device but does the size matter? As my board is smaller than the 12X18 obviously and did not know if that made a difference.......Probably not and its quite a relief I can use the old pen, way back when I got these boards they were very very good boards and its nice to know that they aren't just trash now that Wacom has disowned them! Now, just so you know where it says VSS and GND on the MC145406 I connected one end of my meter to the pin and then the other to the ground plane and got my beep obviously but with the VSS I touched the other lead to an area just north on the board where I saw a plus sign and assumed there must be power coming in or out there, I am not the best with this so please be patient with my slower than normal comprehension....Thanks you've been great Bernard!   Smiley
P.S.  This is also assuming that you are looking at the female end of the serial connector as if you were the male side, just to clarify not sure if that's how it should have been read an obviously I matched the written info off the PCB to come to my conclusions and the MC145406 is placed there exactly as it is on the board, writing is oriented the way I looked down at it from above.
P.S.S. Got my Teensy today!!! Pretty nice to live only twenty miles from them, it was mailed yesterday by regular mail!!   Cool


* MC145406 PinOut.jpg (153.15 KB, 825x659 - viewed 746 times.)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 10:23:43 AM by ArtC » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2011, 03:21:50 PM »

OK -- The markings on the PCB uses the Serial signal names seen in reverse.  (All Wacom boards I have seen do that: as if the Wacom board was the computer and the computer the "slave" peripheral!). But yes, the numbers matches exactly with the UD-1212-R -- so we can proceed with the same mod! Smiley

What we've done here is check which signal is connected where -- we checked the "RS" side (as in RS-232). Now the Teensy connects on the TTL side. So I will copy here the Table 2 from the other thread:

 


Table 2

Summarizes the modification: (NOTE: serial signal names is reversed from the markings on the PCB)

                    MC145406 (removed)
Teensy      Board   Dir TTL side   signal
--------    ------  --- ---------- ------
D2 (RXD)            <-- 10         (RXD)
D3 (TXD)            --> 11         (TXD)
GND         Ground
            N.C.    <-- 12         (CTS)
            Ground  --> 13         (RTS)
            Ground  --> 15         (DTR)
            N.C.    <-- 14         (DSR)

VCC         voltage regulator "bottom" leg




So you can read the UD-1212-R thread mod and go forward! It is the same stuff:  Connect the GND (to one of Teensy GND), Cut leg of voltage regulator, connect the 5v (one of Teensy VCC) -- test the board -- remove the MC145406 -- test the board again -- then connect pin 13 and 15 to the ground plane (make sure you leave 12 and 14 unconnected)-- then connect 10/11 to Teensy D2/D3. Run the waxbee config tool, flash the teensy. Yippee!

NOTE: carefully plan on the wire length and your final teensy position -- put a little more wire than necessary, it is easier to fold wires than extending it. Make sure there is no stress on the "pads" of the PCB. Maybe you could glue or tape the wire on the PCB(?). Be creative. Don't make the wire go accross the active area (and not even close, the sensing goes a little beyond, you can see the vertical and horizontal traces on the PCB).
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 04:10:19 PM by bernard » Logged
ArtC
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« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2011, 08:15:11 PM »

Ok so going to get busy on this, and since everything is the same on this board that is a good thing....I will post some pictures when I am done, I think it may be a little more difficult to position the Teensy in this one because the switch is a very small switch I could possibly place it where the current serial out connection is, I can remove that right?
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bernard
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« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2011, 08:29:40 PM »

yes, no longer need the serial cable nor its connector for that matter.  The main switch I do not know how it is connected, but I suspect it will no longer have any effect either.  I removed it on the UD-1212-R to remove any potential "confusion".

You can opt to leave the Teensy completely outside and attach it with tie-wrap(s) -- or use the unusued Teensy GPIO pins as screw holes (just make sure the screws does not make electrical contact with something else). You can cut the case to fit it somehow? I do not have your tablet case in my hand to help out here.   

You are going to need a bit of that DIY spirit! Smiley Be creative!  Can't wait to see what you will come up with  Grin

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