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Author Topic: Cint®iq 2.0 [K-Jintiq clone]  (Read 49141 times)
eqsOne
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« Reply #60 on: September 03, 2013, 08:57:51 PM »

The good thing is I dont think it's acrylic, the bad thing is I have no idea what could be instead. Must be kind of casted plastic but feels somehow softer than acrylic does in my guess.

You're right, mine is a recessed one and I haven't tried any protections yet. The pen does leave micro scratches in the surface, at least without the felt tip. But as soon as you swich the screen on, they all completely disappear so this doesn't bother me at all. They're simply not in the way while working.

Aligning pen and cursor is done with the help of the driver, which lets you define a required field of the active aera by simply clicking the desired corners with the pen. You can also maually define the exact size of the screen.
The final aligning may take some try and error until you'll find a position set up that works well for your needs and keeps up nearly the same all over the screen. Especially in the very beginning it's not complete exactly like drawing with a real pen and paper, you'll have to play around a bit until your eyes and hands get used to it.
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ThrowingChicken
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« Reply #61 on: September 04, 2013, 01:57:02 AM »

It's probably some sort of melted then injected plastic, I would imagine.  

I went looking and Wacom does make a clear surface sheet.  Unfortunately they no longer make the one for the Intuos 3 A4, and even if they did it appears that the top 1/2" is still grey which means it would block the top of your LCD.  But they still have one for the 12x12, which means if you really wanted to you could purchase it and cut it to size.  If I go this route I might even get it laser cut just to make sure it is perfect.  You'd have to come up with a way to glue it down without it making the display look ugly, that I am not sure how to go about but I am sure it could be figured out after some experimentation.  Maybe even just a tiny drop of glue in the corners would be all that would be required.  The other downside is these sheets are expensive ($30 for the 12x12); I bet I could find an anti-glare sheet with the same thickness for cheaper elsewhere.  

So when you did your paint removal, what steered you away from the oven cleaner method?  

Is there a thread that teaches you how to configure the mapping?  I found the thread for the Intuos 4, linking to TabletMod, is it pretty much the same steps? http://tabletmod.com/Downloads/TabletModCalibrationI4L.pdf

If you had to do it all over again, anything you would do differently?  And assume you had all the parts in hand, how long do you think it would take you to do it a second time? 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 02:00:18 AM by ThrowingChicken » Logged
eqsOne
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« Reply #62 on: September 04, 2013, 09:57:38 AM »

Since I have tons of polishing stuff left, I just repolish the surface from time to time instead of buying extra sheets Wink But one other good thing on a sheet may be the different feeling it provides while moving the tip over the surface. Without sheet, it feels very smooth and therefore way different than on paper.

I tried the thinner method because of the lacking of that recommented oven cleaner and I thought thinner might not be too agressive. I tried out three different ones and they all removed the paint but they all left some milky stains as well.
Nevertheless there must be thinners out there that don't leave stains, guess Hieron & Kareltje found such one. Here's their additional Intuos3 paint-stripping guide.

Yes, the setup-tutorial you found is pretty much (if not exactly) the same as with Intuos3.

The next time I would definitely try to avoid separating the background sheets of the screen-sandwich. I had to do so because mine has been dusty inside, but bringing these back together without catching new dust particles really takes tons of patience.

I guess the whole build could be done in about 6 straight working hours BUT from my experience in reality there always appears something unexpected, which will take some extra time to solve, even if you are really well-prepared.


Edit: Almost forgot - I can recommend reading Lunakov's thread, too. He got me to make the cut-out with an exacto blade. My measuring was a fail but the tool worked great.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 10:52:40 AM by eqsOne » Logged
ThrowingChicken
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« Reply #63 on: September 05, 2013, 10:26:16 PM »

Thanks for the link!  With my penenabled LCD project starting to hit walls I'm finding myself more excited to take on this project.  Since you decided to replace your CCFL, was there a point where you considered replacing it with an LED strip?  Should be less heat and a longer life, but maybe they cause more interference? 

Another thing, I saw in another build or two that some people were connecting the ground on the Wacom to the ground on their LCD; Is this common?  It seems kind of dangerous to me. 
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eqsOne
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« Reply #64 on: September 06, 2013, 08:33:07 AM »

Exactly. To me, an LED strip would have been a gamble. Well, I'm lazy and just wanted that thing to work without reinventing it. So why change a winning horse like the K-Jintiq?

I can't tell if it's actually dangerous bringing the grounds together, but yes, in some cases people could obviously reduce jitter by connecting them. I kept them straight separate as done by Hieron and Kareltje and it works just great.
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ThrowingChicken
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« Reply #65 on: November 12, 2013, 07:01:36 PM »

A couple more quick questions if you don't mind...

I gutted my LCD of everything metal and found that really the only thing metal that would get in the way of the Wacom was the CCFL holder.  The bordering frame does have a very small lip along the back, but only a millimeter or two wide and would not overlap with the LCD's visual area.  It would have to be modified to accommodate the electronics, but do you see any reason why this frame could not be added back to the LCD so that it has a nice clean look along the edges?

Secondly, the CCFL.  Did your CCFL get really hot in the corners?  I extended the cord on mine using some wire taken from a voltage adapter.  I figured that would be good enough to avoid any voltage drops/dimming, and to be honest I didn't study the screen enough before making this modification to be able to tell if dimming has actually occurred or not, I just know it isn't as bright as my other monitors and it gets really hot at both ends of the CCFL.  Not even where I soldered in the extension, but where the stock wire meets the bulb. 
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eqsOne
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« Reply #66 on: November 12, 2013, 08:42:39 PM »

Ugh, no it shouldn't get hot. Last Weekend I upgraded to Mavericks and played around with it a lot. It still does get slightly warm on the upper edge after some time but not hot. No idea what exactly causes your tube to run hot.

As for the frame you mentioned I'm not sure. Might cause trouble for the board locating the pen, might be it's ok, just give it a try. If you run into issues with accuracy, take it out.
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ThrowingChicken
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« Reply #67 on: November 12, 2013, 08:48:31 PM »

What's Mavericks?  I think I might order another CCFL to be safe, one with a longer cord;  How do you select one?  Is it based on the width of the CCFL or is it based on the monitor's diagonal size? 
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eqsOne
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« Reply #68 on: November 13, 2013, 03:32:03 PM »

Mavericks is Apple's new OSX 10.9, had to update SwichResX as well.

I purchased this CCFL. Mine has been already assembled with a longer cord and plug, they don't seem to have it anymore..
Anyway, according to the description of the seller I guess they're based on the screen's diagonal size.
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eqsOne
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« Reply #69 on: November 13, 2013, 03:40:48 PM »

To be more accurate on the heat issue: When I say it gets slightly warm around the screen's upper edge I mean through the assembled Wacom's top surface, not directly the CCFL without the cover.
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ThrowingChicken
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« Reply #70 on: November 14, 2013, 07:22:22 AM »

Yeah, I ran my monitor calibration tool on it just to make sure it wasn't a profile issue and even at full brightness I could only get 106 luminance.  For reference, the target is 255 luminance. 

I'll try a different wire, or maybe remove the sleeves at the ends of the CCFL and solder the line directly to the prongs on that. 
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #71 on: November 14, 2013, 08:48:45 AM »

Here's a ccfl shop site that has some advice about selecting ccfls http://www.ccflwarehouse.com/cclawiwi.html, has a nice walkthrough of steps.

As it sounds like you have found, there can be issues with ccfl cable extending. This is because of the way that they operate, AC high voltage (700-1kV sometimes more) and high operating frequency. To achieve maximum efficiency of the ccfl the current and frequency driving the lamp should be matched to it and the alternating current should be as close to a sine wave as possible, all factors that determine how long a ccfl cable should be. Increasing the wire length increases the resistance to the current which reduces the current, and can change the shape of the waveform away from a sine wave, both of these factors as well as some more discrete effects will cause the bulbs to be dimmer.
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bernard
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« Reply #72 on: November 14, 2013, 02:15:36 PM »

If you decide to solder: At these high voltages, you want to keep a safe distance and good isolation between the "metal" -- it can arc.  If you look closely, they do lots of things in that regard.

Someone on the forum once said to solder only near the ends of the cable, not have a solder joint in the middle. Which would typically occur when "extending". It can cause reflections.
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #73 on: November 14, 2013, 04:51:41 PM »

Adding to what Bernard has said, reflections can also occur if a different type of wire is used to extend the cable, or potentially if you change wire guage to extend the wire. At high frequencies wires do not behave in the same way as you would expect from low voltage, low frequency dc electronics. I suppose what I'm saying is that you can extend the cables by splicing and soldering (using adequate heat shrink tube insulation) but it's probably better to extend using the same guage and type of wire and replace the original wires with new longer pieces, or buy longer ccfl cables.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2013, 04:57:01 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #74 on: November 14, 2013, 08:08:22 PM »

On the forum, quite a few people had a positive experience by doing it without following any of these rules. But others had issues and some of these little details helped.
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