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Author Topic: Monoprice tablet  (Read 14685 times)
abeyance
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« on: January 24, 2013, 08:30:49 AM »

The New Case Mod (Still tweaking)


(Shaky Video - I'll post another when my son comes home to help me.)
http://youtu.be/yRqY0PR_VaQ

Alright, sirs. After learning as much as I could about specific pieces I need and how this tablet thing works, I've decided I am going to be the guy to get the Monoprice (UC Logic) DIY Cintiq up and running. Here are my parts:

Monoprice 10X6.25 Inches Graphic Drawing Tablet -$50.00
R.RM5451 controller kit from our good friend Christine at njytouch - $40.00
LTN121x1-L02 Samsung LCD from one of my old dual USB 12" iBooks - free ($10.00 on ebay)
OPTIX 11 in. x 14 in. x .093 in. Acrylic Sheet (5 sheets) - $16.00
11 in. x 14 in. x .050 in. Non-glare Styrene Sheet (1 sheet) - $4.00
Crown Bolt #8-32 x 3 in. Coarse Stainless-Steel Flat-Head Phillips Machine Screws with Nylon Lock Nut (4-Pack) - $1.00
Poster Board, 22" x 28", Black (1 sheet) - $1.00
Various Nylon Washers and 2 Pen caps for spacing - free
Ionized metal plating from back of an Acer 17in. Monitor LCD - free
Metallic Sharpie - free

Dimensions:
Tablet area: W:10 in. x H:6.25 in.
LCD    area: W:9.6 x H:7.3 in.

Monoprice Driver Settings:
Monitor Settings
OY:1900  WY:1039
OY:63 HY:698

Pen Area Dimensions
W:24.99CM
H:16.72CM




I began by stripping the LCD from the iBook. After I finished I began cleaning up the LCD. I removed the the bottom metal by removing the screws on the very sides of the LCD. It went fairly smooth. Popped out the metal shielding along the bottom and put the screws back in. Next, I unsecured the PCB (that is the right word for these boards is it not?) from the upper portion of the monitor in the same fashion. It was held on by even less... tape. To say I was scared by the easiness of the process so far would've been an understatement. But so far so good. I also extended the the power wires for the LCD bulbs. I know the tape is ugly, but I am paranoid. And it looks better than my soldering. Tongue


I began to connect all the various PCB to test. Everything plugged in with minimal effort. I then placed the LCD directly on top of the Monoprice tablet and hit the power button. Not only did she power up perfectly, but she also had (in my opinion) less jitter than I expected. It was just a few pixels both ways. After tinkering with the refresh rate I got the jitter down to about a pixel, if that. 75 refresh rate seemed optimal, but I only tested in increments of 5. Seeing as how I hadn't done any shielding on any of the parts I figured that everything was a go and continued.

Proof of Concept Video
http://youtu.be/iuBHpusZ8Ng


After doodling for an hour I noticed the heat issue. I rectified this by placing rubber washers about 2-3mm thick at the for corners of the LCD. Boom! Problem solved. It breathes just fine.
Now for the casing. I was going to piece together the shells from my old iBook spare parts, but noticed I still had the housing from the Acer I killed trying to figure all this out. It snaps together. But after watching the Tabletmod.com videos and some advice from a friend about how to secure the LCD dead center in the casing. I went with just plain acrylics.

I started by taking all of the acrylic sheets, the styrene sheet, the ionized metal plating, and construction paper and drilling holes for the machine screw at the corners of each 6mm x 6mm at each corner with my dremel.

Next, I used Adobe Illustrator to mark out the measurements by centering the sheets and the exact size of the LCD. I cut out the center from one piece of pre cut construction paper (I put a touch of permanent metallic marker on it for looks), 1 piece of acrylic sheet and 1 piece of styrene sheet making a small notch at the bottom left hand side to fit the power cables for the LCD thru.

Facing down I began to stack my pieces. One piece of acrylic sheet for the top, the prettified construction paper with the center cut, washers for spacers between the tablet and LCD, the styrene sheet (w/ center cut), the acrylic sheet (w/ center cut) and then dropped the LCD down and it fit like a glove.

Placing the tablet was a touch more difficult, but not by much. The tablet has a tapered front and a raised lip on the back so it took some experimenting with the amount/size of washers that I needed to make sure it a) stayed stable and b) get as close to the correct height as possible as not to buckle the acrylic sheets. Once completed I threw another acrylic sheet on. On top of that was the ionized metal plating covered in construction paper.

The bottom piece of acrylic sheeting was a bit more cumbersome. I wanted the thing as thin as possible, but I also wanted it to tilt. So, I mounted the small piece of  styrene sheet that I put my PCBs (controller and such wrapped in anti static baggie) on to the inside of it. I decided upon using these cool little black pen caps w/white stripes on them on the back of the enclosure to give the back room to breathe and to give me a tilt while also allowing me to drill holes in the acrylic sheet for a mount. The front stands at just over an inch while the back is almost 2 and a half inches high (great title IMO).

With everything now stacked I cut the machine screws to the proper sized (by proper I mean I eyeballed it) and put the lock nuts on. On the lock nuts I put some industrial rubber cement so they would act like feet for the enclosure. This means the glass never touches the surface so I get even better airflow and the PCBs are even more protected.

The design feels and looks good (to me at least). And I will be adding siding to the project once I think I have made the necessary changes regarding jitter, heat and mouse accuracy(fairly perfect right now). I will be doing this by cutting strips of styrene sheet with construction paper behind it and placing them in small slits i have made in the acrylic sheets with my dremel. Meaning four screws still hold the whole thing together. And it's nowhere near as complex as the case mods from tabletmod.com


Please feel free to ask questions or request more videos/photos. I'll be happy to oblige. Enjoy!
-Frank

Next? The 12 in. x 9 in. Monoprice tablet with the screen from my 17 in. Powerbook. Muwahahahahaha!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:16:19 AM by abeyance » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2013, 02:55:01 PM »

Hi abeyance, welcome!

You may have seen that most people that attempt this kind of build use Wacom tablets and tend to experience what has become known as jitter; Jitter is essentially caused by interference noise produced by the screen which 'blocks' the exact position of the pen.

In your case it sounds alot like your screen is completely 'blocking' the signal from the pen, maybe due to a too much noise created by the screen that it cannot hear your pen (ie like trying to talk someone a couple of metres away in a crowded rock (or some other loud) concert).

I'm not sure how much help we can really give you on this since you are using a Monoprice tablet not a Wacom. I do not have any experience with this particular tablet or it's method of signal communication so there's not too much I can advise you with, but the fact that this only happens with the screen on is a big indicator that something about it is stopping the digitizer (circuit part) of the tablet from 'seeing the pen'. You might try something like adjusting the resolution of the screen or other frequency settings (powerstrip utility) to see if this changes how the tablet responds.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 02:57:19 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2013, 04:28:25 PM »

*removed to take up less space*
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:20:27 AM by abeyance » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2013, 08:22:38 AM »

most likely you won't be able to swap the LVDS controller.  Especially if the connectors don't even match to start with!
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abeyance
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 11:11:42 AM »

*removed to take up less space*
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:17:07 AM by abeyance » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2013, 07:35:04 AM »

*removed to take up less space*
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:17:31 AM by abeyance » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 11:20:14 AM »

 Cool That's great! Good work. It's good to see that other tablets can be used.
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abeyance
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 08:21:12 AM »

Thanks go to my son, Kalel, for helping out and cheering me on!
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aliron
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2013, 08:22:02 PM »

so you just placed a LCD screen on top of the monoprice tablet? You didn't have to disassemble the tablet at all?

I am trying to do this with an old TFT LCD monitor (internal power supply) that I had laying around. I placed the PCBs behind the tablet, and the screen on top of the tablet, and it did not register the stylus. I was wondering how thin is your LCD?
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 02:40:43 AM by aliron » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2013, 10:21:14 PM »

Apologies for the slow response. I've been away for a while. Yes, that's correct. I did not disassemble the tablet. The LCD I used is about 4mm with the protective acrylic sheet over it adding less than 1mm. One trick you might try to reduce the height of the pen is to cut the nib shorter. that may give you a MM or two to play with.

Abey
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boogerlad
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« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2013, 05:48:49 PM »

How would you calibrate this thing if you have a very small screen of 5 inches? Do the drivers have a ui to do that? I'm very interested in this project but with a smaller screen.
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abeyance
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« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2013, 03:09:10 AM »

How would you calibrate this thing if you have a very small screen of 5 inches? Do the drivers have a ui to do that? I'm very interested in this project but with a smaller screen.

Well, that would mean the tablet is far lager than the screen so there would be some issues, but the drivers do allow fo you to have an "active portion" of your screen just as if your screen were bigger than the LCD. It would work both ways.

Hope this helps,
Abey
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aliron
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« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2013, 01:16:09 AM »

Have a similar build, except with a bigger monoprice tablet, and it jitters like crazy on some parts of the screen when I have a piece of acrylic on top of the LCD. Does anyone have any suggestions for this?
« Last Edit: November 27, 2013, 07:33:04 AM by aliron » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2014, 02:01:59 AM »

Have a similar build, except with a bigger monoprice tablet, and it jitters like crazy on some parts of the screen when I have a piece of acrylic on top of the LCD. Does anyone have any suggestions for this?

I have a couple. Sorry for being away for so long. cut the nib on your pen to half the size to compensate for the extra distance the acrylic makes. There is also an app on here that reduces jitter. You will not get rid of ALL jitter. Just be warned. It's there even on normal tablets.
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