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Author Topic: Wacom GD-0912-U vs. Samsng Syncmaster 570P  (Read 15336 times)
Agerkvist
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« on: February 26, 2013, 09:28:33 AM »

I have a dream. A dream where I combine http://www.trust.com/products/product.aspx?artnr=13022 with http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/8ms-19,977-10.html to make my very own tablet/monitor abomination which henceforth shall be known as Frankentiq.

Is this type of stuff even possible with a non-wacom tablet? I don't see why not, but I might be overlooking something.

The tablet, while it might seem like junk, is actually pretty darn good. I've had it for 5+ years I think and it hasn't been used for the last 3 but last night I hooked it up and it actually outperformed my Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch in many ways.

The monitor...well...it's my old monitor, but since I bought a laptop my old(OOOOLLLLLDDD) desktop isn't being used and neither is the monitor so I might aswell give this a go, before I shell out 900 $ to get a Yiynova or Bosto.

If anyone has any advice regarding the above components, please, please let me know. I've assembled a few desktops and I can install new GF cards etc., but I'm not very hardware or electronics savvy. I really don't know what the hell I'm doing and I keep telling myself it won't be easy - and at the same time there's a part of my saying "pffthhh it can't be THAT hard. You just strip the monitor, slam the stripped tablet underneath and your're good to go.".

I'll know better soon enough. I'm exited - especially because I'm still optimistic and believe that there's actually a chance this might turn out successfully Smiley

I'll be reading up on as much as I can on this and other sites, and then I'll return with any questions I still have.

Great to be here! Smiley

Kristian.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2013, 11:10:40 PM by Agerkvist » Logged
Agerkvist
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2013, 10:03:58 AM »

Ok, so I'll just start adding questions here:

1) The monitor is a 19 inch. The tablet - if my calculations are correct - is 14 inches. This mean that there will be parts of the screen unreachable via the tablet - can you somehow calibrate the screen to only run in 14 inches, in the middle of the screen? I would have no issue with blocking out parts of the screen, but that will be no use, if the screen is still using the full area.
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bernard
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2013, 06:24:08 AM »

You tried my simtiq planner? You can compute how many pixels will be out of the inactive area. Beware of aspect ratios!

it is possible to restrict the video. Not always easy (but it can be). It depends on the OS, the graphics card driver, whether we are talking dvi or vga, and if more complex, your resistance to multi reboots and other niceties of Windows drivers installation and deinstallation. This exercice has a good side: playing with video frequencies can be a good weapon against jitterbugs.
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Agerkvist
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2013, 03:40:39 PM »

Ah, a reply!  Grin

No, I haven't tried the simtiq planner - but now that I know of it's existence I certainly will. I've done some calculations myself tho, and I think the 19' monitor is entirely too big - I'd prefer not having to restricting the video display. Mainly because then I have one less thing to worry about.

Apart from that I got a bit deterred when I tested the responsiveness of my tablet through a stack of paper - it only worked through a thickness of around 5-6 mm. I'm pretty sure that the panel from the syncmaster will be thichker than that - and without knowing for sure, I'm thinking it will be hard to find a decently priced panel only 5 mm thich?

This lead me to thinking - would it be possible to strip and convert the panel from an old laptop? These panels surely must be thinner?

I came across this link in my seach: http://www.engadget.com/2011/09/06/how-to-turn-a-spare-lcd-panel-into-a-working-monitor-for-33/
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bernard
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2013, 07:24:33 PM »

5 to 6 mm is the typical thickness of lcd panels since a long time ago. higher end (older) monitors tend to be exotic and are very thick.
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2013, 07:32:10 PM »

Hi Agerkvist,

When you tested the response through the paper was the paper stacked upon the circuit or on top of the tablets plastic top? you will get a few vital mm if you measure from the circuit.

Another point to note here is that you should also allow for some kind of cover (glass/perspex/plexiglass) to protect whatever screen you pick; This should probably be at least 2mm in itself depending on material used.

Laptop screens are a popular choice on this forum due to their low profile and relative cheapness, and many builders have used these with varied levels of success when it comes to cursor jitter.

It looks as though on the site you referenced that the person that turned the laptop screen into a monitor has done so in way which is also widely done on this forum. There is a company which a lot of people seem to favor on this site called NJYTouch who retail through ebay.

3 parts are needed to convert a laptop screen; An LVDS controller, an inveter/LED driver (depends on if you have ccfl backlighting or LED), and a power supply. NJYTouch can provide all of these bits and relatively cheaply too; It is important to contact NJYTouch by email to advise them of the panel you will be hooking the circuit up to so that they can ensure that the circuit has the correct driver installed.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 07:33:52 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Agerkvist
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2013, 09:47:31 AM »

5 to 6 mm is the typical thickness of lcd panels since a long time ago. higher end (older) monitors tend to be exotic and are very thick.

Ah ok, well that's good news - even though I've pretty much decided that my current tablet and monitor aren't a good match for each other. Ideally I'd need a 15 inch widescreen monitor - I think. I'll try and find a better fitting screen. Actually I might even go for an entirely other tablet aswell, if I can find a decently priced one that is a better fit. I don't really care about brand, but I'm thinking wacom tablets might be more fitting since they have more software for calibrating etc. and also a larger community.

@Aerendraca I just put a stack of paper on top of the tablet, so I should be able to get a few more mm when it get's disassembled.

I'll definately check out NJYTouch. I was looking at older laptops last night and some of them really seem to have quite thin screens which I think would be excellent. The downside to this is that I'll have to convert it myself, and honestly I'm no tinkerer - but hey, I might just end up one! And it does look manageable from the descriptions.

Most people seem to use Wacom tablets - especially the Intuos line - is this because of the stuff mentioned above, or just because of Wacoms reputation with tablets?

Thanks a bunch for the replies, I REALLY appreciate it.
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Agerkvist
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2013, 09:51:31 PM »

Fffnnnnngagghhhhh......

So I got this REALLY cheap 15' monitor today, took it home, removed the stand and screws, started gently prying of the casing - then I stopped and decided to actually check if it worked before I did anything else.

And alas, the monitor is blank and the green power light just blinks. The monitor sort of gives off a teeny tiny 'turn on' sound when the light blinks (this sound I've discovered seems to be coming from the build in speakers). Did I actually manage to break something already? Is this something that can be fixed?

But then - I leave the monitor on my table, power cord unplugged etc. then I decide to give it another go, so I plug it in the wall socket and it turns on giving me the standard "Check video cable" - Great! The monitor isn't entirely dead.

Then I plugged in the vga cable to my Laptop, and the screen goes blank, light starts to blink.

I unplug and try it again - still blank and blinking. WTH?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 10:18:14 PM by Agerkvist » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2013, 08:41:20 AM »

I have a few questions to help diagnose:

Does the screen have a power supply inside it or has it got an external power brick? can you post some pictures of the circuits?

LED of cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) as the backlight?

When the screen was ON and showing the 'check cable' message was the whole screen illuminated evenly? Was there an area which was slightly darker or perhaps slightly more pink in colour?

All of the cables are securely in place? None have slipped out while you were taking things apart?

What's the make and model?

erm........ that's it for now, might have some more questions later depending on answers.


« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 08:43:04 AM by Aerendraca » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2013, 08:47:35 AM »

Also, it might be better to have posted this as a new question so that anyone else in a similar position could find the information quickly.
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Agerkvist
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2013, 10:47:38 AM »

Q1)Does the screen have a power supply inside it or has it got an external power brick? can you post some pictures of the circuits?

A1) No external power brick. I can post pictures later if needed(at work right now) - but the casing is still on, so I'd have to take it apart.

Q2) LED of cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) as the backlight?

A2) I honestly don't know - it's this monitor: http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=dk&dlc=da&lc=en&product=324205

Q3) When the screen was ON and showing the 'check cable' message was the whole screen illuminated evenly? Was there an area which was slightly darker or perhaps slightly more pink in colour?

A3) Hmm it's difficult to say with certainty, since it was just a white box with black text floating around on the screen - but I didn't notice any differences. There certainly wasn't any pinkish colour to be found.

Q4) All of the cables are securely in place? None have slipped out while you were taking things apart?

A4) As far as I can tell, yes, everything is in place - I can't tell if they've loosened on the inside before I take it apart of course.

Q5) What's the make and model?

A5) http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=dk&dlc=da&lc=en&product=324205

Also, it might be better to have posted this as a new question so that anyone else in a similar position could find the information quickly.

You're probably right - I just didn't want to flood the board with too many threads, but I can see why it might be beneficial to others Smiley

Thanks ALOT.
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2013, 11:58:06 AM »

Ok, it looks like this monitor uses CCFL backlighting which is expected for a 15" screen but I don't think that the backlighting is your problem here.

A quick search on the net appears to confirm my initial suspicions that this is a power issue with quite a few people reporting the same thing with this panel, and I would expect that when you take the screen apart (if you decide to do so) you will see at least one bad filter capacitor on the power board.
Bad filter capacitors tend to have bulged tops and/or sometimes have what looks like a kind of goo coming out the bottom of them. If you compare the capacitors accross the board it should be obvious what i mean (assuming not all of them have gone bad Smiley )

This is a fairly simple and cheap fix if you have access to a soldering iron.

see: http://forum.eserviceinfo.com/viewtopic.php?t=20281 for others with the same problem.

Note: A couple of people claim that the problem may be a diode (circuit around it will be heat tarnished, possible lack of solder or cracked solder, component itself may show signs of overheating). Once again though this is a simple and cheap fix if you have access to a soldering iron.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 12:01:17 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Agerkvist
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« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2013, 12:08:49 PM »

I stumbled upon some video of a guy replacing capacitors when troubleshooting myself, so that might be it yeah - I've no idea what they are or what they do, but I'll try and see if I can replace them Cheesy

I do have access to a soldering iron, I just don't have any soldering skills - but I'll just pick those up on youtube Tongue

Looks like it has to be taken apart, and in the mean time I've got my eye on another just as reasonably priced 15', so let's see where it goes.

When I get home I'll open it and check the capacitors and post my findings here.

Thanks Smiley
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2013, 12:44:51 PM »

A quick safety point to note: The big black capacitor on the power circuit (probably labelled '400V') can store alot of charge even after the screen has been removed from the mains, be sure to discharge it before you poke around too much as it may give you a nasty shock. See reply 5# on my build log: http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?topic=2198.0 for more info on how to do this.

Any questions just ask.

Good luck!
« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 12:48:32 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Agerkvist
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« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2013, 02:57:19 PM »

Hmm ok, better watch that capacitor then  Shocked

But honestly, when it comes to discharging things and messing with circuitry I'm totally out of my element - so much in fact, that even though I read the description on how to do it, I still don't know how to.
Can't I just wear rubber gloves and try not to touch it? -_-

I also don't have a multimeter or anything of the sort, let alone experience with one - come to think of it, I don't even think I have any rubber gloves...

Grabbing another monitor that actually works seems like the safe option here. But I'll face similar obstacles later no matter what I do, I'm sure Tongue

I'm tearing it apart when I come home no matter what!
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