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Author Topic: Huion tablets  (Read 18385 times)
profaldo
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« on: March 01, 2013, 10:06:21 PM »

http://www.huion-tablet.com/product/product.php?sku=1005

They have 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity
Looks nice, and is powered by USB

I did a quick check on ebay and amazon, and they are available for much cheaper (around 40-50 usd)

There is also a wireless option

The only problem is that they are pretty small - 6 inches by 8 inches

Has anybody ever used one of these?

It is interesting that they are soooo cheap
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Chocochan
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2013, 03:12:02 PM »

They're old hat.

I have one in white. It's the latest version (K58) that comes with a rechargeable pen than the AAA battery ones. It's slim and light. It charges using a USB cable that plugs into the top of the pen. I actually like the size and design. When I had an Intuos4, I thought the buttons and gigantic border were a waste of real estate for active area. I never really used the buttons anyway. The tablet I have is what I plan to make my DIY Cintiq from. I feel this time I've made a good choice as the drivers aren't that bad, you can move the active area around with the pen or mouse to fit just where you want it and configre stuff like pen offset, sensitivity and more. It also has a 15mm reading height right out of the box which is great since a LCD panel is going over it. The hard part for me is finding a 8.9 or 9" 16:10 ratio panel.

I've found a great one, but can't get the datasheet for it so I can't get a controller programmed...  Cry Other than that it's VERY responsive and has a nice clean look.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2013, 03:45:55 PM by Chocochan » Logged
profaldo
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« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2013, 04:16:32 PM »

Choco, how is the performance of the pen compared to the wacom?

What about jitter issues when put in front of an lcd (for a diy cintiq)?

I also found the buttons on the wacom a waste of space, but I use it only for note taking. I need a tablet as small as a 10' laptop so that I can make my own portable windows tablet.
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Chocochan
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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2013, 06:53:01 PM »

It find it OK, but it all depends on what you think of the pen. The Huion pen tip is a bit springier and softer that the Wacom one and of course there's no eraser, but I never used it. My one rattles a little if you shake it, but it is only the pen tip, nothing inside is broken. In fact the pen is very comfortable. The one I have is very lightweight since it has an internal rechargeable battery, so it is not back heavy if it had an AAA battery and I think it's slimmer than the Intuos4 Grip Pen (I don't own an Intuos4 anymore) which is a bonus for me as I hated how wide it was. The pen also turns itself off when not in use saving battery power. Just tap it on the tablet to get it going again (I think a button press will work too).

EDIT: Pen wakes up instantly when near the tablet. Just never noticed. I also have a Motion Computing pen that works with Wacom technology and it has a definite rattle though it still works. Just just to show you even the branded stuff can not be perfect!

But for some reason it is very responsive, you can do very fine lines with the Huion with ease. It really does sense very light pressure. Its technology is based on the UC-Logic ones, so if you've read the reviews about how good the "Monoprice branded" tablets are, you can't go far wrong for the price. Some people say that the tablet's build is a bit crappy, but I don't really find anything wrong with it. Everything is neatly finished and there's no creaking when you press down on it. I think it's because it's so light. A heavier tablet isn't always better, especially if you're holding it like a sketchpad in your arm (which is how I'd like to use it). The only thing that may annoy is that the mini USB connector is on the left side of the tablet only (there's no right hand one so you can switch depending on your setup or handedness). This is annoying for me as my PC is on my right side of my desk. This will change in the future when I build a new mini-ITX system I'd actually be able to pop anywhere on my desktop.

Unfortunately I don't know anything about the jitters yet as I don't have a LCD panel to put on it as I'm still searching for a good one (needs to be 16:10 ratio) and a compatible controller, but I have heard rumours that battery powered tablets can help with jitter issues simply because the pen is running under its own power and doesn't have to rely on the tablet like battery-free ones do. It also helps with the reading height as well. The best thing to do is give it a try. There are super cheap ones on eBay, but maybe it would be best for you to buy it directly from Amazon so you can return it if you don't like it. I bought mine directly from Huion and they catered to my needs (I wanted a white tablet with a white pen holder and black pen nibs, the rechargeable pen only comes in black). If you do like it, grab the rechargeable pen from Huion if you want a lighter, better built pen. It's only $20 and uses the same nibs as the other pens.

The tablet has an interesting option that made me think at first that it was faulty. In the driver settings was an option to enable "support PC tablet". This was on by default and for me it prevented the tablet from working in anything but a graphics program. The moment I opened Sketchbook pro, bam, it worked. When I closed it, all I could use was the mouse. If you disable the option, it works like the Wacoms (as in all the time). It might be useful for some people. Usually disabling the pen tablet options in Windows improves the way responsiveness of the tablet (this is universal and it doesn't matter which brand you have), so that could be the reason mine just stopped with PC tablet mode was enabled. Hopefully, I'll find a decent screen soon and will be able to fill you in more on the jitter front.

But here is a video where someone used a UC-Logic based tablet to build a DIY cintiq. It looks like it doesn't lag like some I've seen and that could be due to the battery in the pen...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7TkvIuC6Oo

Hope this helps! Smiley
« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 05:14:32 PM by Chocochan » Logged
profaldo
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2013, 12:21:12 PM »

Thanks a lot for that detailed post Chocochan.

I currently have a wacom 3 (9x12) that I am struggling to fit into something portable. The tablet is huge, and I got a picture frame which is even bigger :S

For my next project, I am looking out for a small tablet to fit with my Asus 1005p EEE pc. It is a 10 inch laptop that is pretty quick and portable. So, my search is for something as close as possible in terms of dimension, with an active area of 6x8 inches. The plan is to convert it into a tablet that fits into a meeting folder - that way I do not worry about carrying paper, and can organize notes properly as well.

In the link that you shared - there did not seem to by any jitter - which makes sense if the pen is powered via battery.

Anyways, if I pull off the 10 inch tablet, the next obvious target would be the 14 inch tablet Cheesy
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Chocochan
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2013, 05:51:58 PM »

No problem, profaldo.

I've managed to locate something for my build; a Doublesight DS-90U 9" USB powered monitor. I won't be able to get it until next week, but I too had portability in mind and something using just two USB ports would be perfect. Granted it's only 1024 x 600 resolution, but to be honest I mostly draw on A5 so small screens are not really an issue for me when you can zoom in and out (and I use Autodesk Sketchbook Pro). It's the only one I could find near the 8" x 5" active area size of the Huion AND in 16:10 ratio. The active area will be bigger than the screen but only by a teeny bit, so it shouldn't be too hard to calibrate. Once I get the monitor to take apart, I'll let you know of the jitters.

One thing I know I will have to do is to take the metal backing off the LCD panel. I've done this before with Mimo 7" monitor, by carefully unclipping the metal frame around the panel and just lifting ONLY the backing off (this prevents dust getting in and any issues with misalignment). Then I cut a hole in the back the exact size of the viewable area (which is ALWAYS smaller than the frame) and clip it back together so that the layers inside still have support. As long as the white diffusing layer has no scratches on it, it'll work like nothing happened. This is to allow the electromagnetic signals to pass through, otherwise the pen will do nothing. The LCD's circuit board is a huge source of inference and will need to be folded down and away from the screen itself. The only other issue is the type of cable it uses and how many pins it has.

If I'm lucky one of the FFC cables I already have will fit it as I'll need to extend it to reach round the back of the tablet board. I'll be seriously screwed if it uses IPEX (like what the iPad screen uses). They're real hard and expensive to modify and/or customise. After that is when the jitter has to be fought. And it'll be hard as most USB monitors (not all mind you, some actually can display higher or lower than their native output, but they cost A LOT. Lilliput is one brand that has one that can display 1920 x 1080) have a fixed resolution and sometimes frequency due to the DisplayLink chip inside which is locked to a specific firmware. There is no way I know of that can alter this and DisplayLink have vanished (well their forums did last time I looked), so there'll be no help from them.

I don't think I could go higher than what I have. It would just end up being too big. I have a small desk and like compactness, so this would be perfect. Even the Wacom Cintiq 12WX looks huge with that massive bezel round a 12" screen. I know it's that way for housing electronics, but they certainly could've designed it better! It's the same with their regular tablets. Really huge bezel compared to other brands.
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abeyance
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« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2013, 10:22:11 PM »

Oddly enough there are several of us working with UC Logic based sensor boards/tablets. I just used a Monoprice branded tablet to make my 'cintiq'. My jitter is very slight and infrequent. Enough so where I can use LazyNezumi and PowerStrip to correct it down to nothing. I am using Huion's drivers because they are more stable and updated more frequently than the monprice or uc logic drivers. And I am awaiting my P80 pen from Huion. It's just a better crafted pen as Choco pointed out.
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william
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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2013, 02:46:53 AM »

Huion Graphic Drawing Pen Tablet Express your inner creativity like a professional artist would have! With 8 x 5'' of Active Area on the Tablet, Huion gives you a thinner but smarter, more sensitive platform where you can show your talent on. It is easy to install, compatible with PCs, Macs, and all major graphic applications as well.

Advanced Pen Technology
To simulate traditional digital pens, the Huion 580 features 2048 levels of pen pressure sensitivity as well as pen tilt recognition. Varying the pressure of the pen against the tablet can create variations in line width and opacity, which makes you feel as if you are drawing with a real pen.

Annotate for Word
Allows handwriting, annotations with the Tablet Pen on Microsoft Word. Apart from graphic applications, Huion Graphic Tablet 580 is also widely used in Microsoft Word for annotation, which is indeed useful for office workers.

PenCommander
Allows you to write down the command symbols directly on the Digital Tablet to manipulate the computer. You can use the pen as a cursor and create instructions to your PC according to your own operating habits.

PenSigner
Insert signatures or hand drawn graphics into the document. Having trouble with signing signatures on countless of files and papers? Huion Graphic Drawing Pen Tablet can solve your problem with inserting your own signatures into the documents in order to save your time in a stylish way.

Package Contents:
A. Huion 580 Tablet
B. Wireless Pen(with 2 programmable buttons, 1 AAA battery needed)
C. Pen Stand (Pin tip /Tip Clip in inside)
D. User Manual

http://www.huiontablet.com/product/product.php?sku=1005
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bernard
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2013, 04:40:57 AM »

The above looks like spam but I will make an exception and leave it since it talks about a tablet.  Tongue
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2013, 05:19:02 PM »

If it is spam that's a lucky strike!  Grin
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