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Author Topic: Chocochan's build: The Starlet  (Read 22249 times)
Chocochan
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« on: March 27, 2013, 11:50:01 PM »

Well, I reckon it's finally time I put up a build log for my DIY cintiq, which I'm calling the Starlet. There's a reason for this, but I might not do it... well, you'll just have to wait and see. Smiley Here is a list of what I am using for the build:

Huion K58 8" x 5" tablet (that's right! I'm not using a Wacom!)
Doublesight DS-90U 9" USB monitor (well it's really 8.9" but who cares, it's 16:10 which the tablet stupidly is and the resolution is 1024 x 600 which surprisingly I can live with)

At the moment, that's all so far as I have run into a big problem which I'll describe below. The tablet casing is very thin, so I don't think I can fit everything in there so a little (read: most likely a LOT) modification will need to be made. Here's what I've done so far:

After opening the monitor to see what I'm working with it was a mixed bag. Firstly, the LCD panel has a white plastic back which meant no faffing with a metal backplate:
 

* SANY0108.JPG (46.85 KB. 900x506 - viewed 499 times.)

The metal frame around the panel doesn't cause any mischief during tests on top of the unopened tablet and from further modifications explained later, holds everything in so can't be removed.

PROBLEM 1:

One of my worst fears was realised. The LCD cable uses a wretched IPEX connector:


* SANY0141.JPG (54.57 KB. 900x675 - viewed 438 times.)

Meaning I had no way of easily extending it and believe me, it NEEDS extending as it's only 7cm long! I located the datasheet for the panel which you can view here for reference:

http://www.beyondinfinite.com/lcd/Library/Chimei/N089L6-L02.pdf


I can find IPEX cables with the connector required, but only on one end and not both which this one is...Angry So I decided not to worry about it just yet as I had another (albeit smaller) problem...

PROBLEM 2:

There's a ribbon cable that connects the to the power for the LED backlight. Its length meant that it would need extending to allow me to unfold the LCD panel's PCB:


* SANY0112.JPG (42.72 KB. 900x506 - viewed 482 times.)

Examining it further, it was simply soldered to the PCB, meaning all I had to do was to solder on a couple of wires. But before I could continue on this I had an extra problem after I tried to fold down the PCB...

PROBLEM 3:

The metal frame holding the LCD panel's innards in was preventing the ribbon cables holding the PCB to open out fully. Fearing that damage may befall the cables, I gently removed the metal frame. Firstly there were 4 small screws holding it and then lots of clips. Using a spatula dental tool (I use for my sculpting) and a craft blade, I carefully pried it off making sure nothing fell out. If you come across anything like this, heed my words and TAKE YOUR BLASTED TIME! A slip of the wrist and you could break the glass or scuff up the diffusing sheet at the back so that any time the screen displays white, you WILL know about it. Other annoying problems would be that the sheets inside get separated allowing dust and fingerprints (from your attempts to get them back in place and in order) to get on the perfectly clean surfaces which are near impossible to get rid of in a home environment (there's always that one little speck of dust or hair you didn't see until you turn it on after you've painstaking put it back together!) Luckily, none of this happened to me.

Next, laying the frame over the LCD panel, I marked where the ribbon cables would be with a sharpie. Using my Dremel Stylus and a cutting wheel I carefully cut out the spaces marked (use a vice!) and then followed up with a sanding drum to smooth the edges. Easy! Sorry there's no pics of this process, but I was keen to just get it back together again. And now back to problem 2. Rummaging through my spare bits and crap, I found some red and black wires and used them for positive and negative respectively. Gently raising the LED ribbon cable up (stuck down with some double sided tape), I taped the end to a little wooden "stand" so that I could solder it without heat transferring down to the LCD panel. The other ends of the wire I soldered to the PCB quick-like to ensure the heat wouldn't affect the other surface mounted components. Success! After powering it up and checking it was OK, I used a little double sided tape to hold down the end of the ribbon cable and stuck a piece of electrical tape over the top. The other ends I left alone.


* SANY0131.JPG (33.95 KB. 900x675 - viewed 476 times.)


* SANY0132.JPG (67.02 KB. 900x675 - viewed 446 times.)

This may give a little issue with the LCD not being completely flush with the tablet sensor board. This might not be so bad since I wanted to take advantage of the extra screwholes on the sides of the LCD panel frame and mount it to the top half of the tablet casing. Only time will tell. I noticed that there was a high pitched whine now coming from the LCD. Either it was always there and I never noticed it, or the wire extensions caused it. It could be that the PCB isn't grounded anymore since the two ground points are now not connected to anything when it's flipped down. Re-grounding it may help (I hope). The finished result:


* SANY0160.JPG (49.03 KB. 900x675 - viewed 435 times.)

Now comes the biggest problem I have so far and the one that may kill this build for good if I can't get it solved...

PROBLEM 4: (dun dun dun!)

I knew about this problem before I started the modifications, but I had hoped that folding out the LCD panel's PCB would fix it. Not so. When the LCD panel is off, the tablet pen is recognised no problem. The signal obviously couldn't penetrate the PCB, but that's not a issue anymore. However, the moment power is applied to the LCD panel... NOTHING. The cursor just will not move. I can't understand why. Today while I was testing the wire extensions, I turned off the LCD panel and managed to get the pen to move. It took a while almost like the LCD panel creates a charge and it needs to dissipate. When I turned the LCD panel back on... the pen worked! And the jitter wasn't so bad either! Maybe like a 2 or 3 pixels or so (there were random clicks though, so they will need sorting). But if I lift the pen away from the tablet and move it back, it goes back to doing nothing again. It's so strange.

I haven't grounded or shielded anything yet, as I'm not sure how to go about it. What I did try was Powerstrip, only to discover that it can't change the frequency of USB monitors as they are fixed (I originally thought only the resolution was fixed. This one is stuck at 65Hz). So that's it so far. I don't know exactly how to ground the PCB and where to ground it to. When I first opened the monitor, the controller board was mounted to a metal frame with built-in standoffs. I don't know if they are something I need to apply to the build or not (probably unlikely). Speaking of the controller board, it's really thin:


* SANY0118.JPG (129.03 KB. 900x506 - viewed 388 times.)

It's 167mm x 50mm and the underside is flat. I plan to desolder the mini USB connector and extend it out to the same side as the tablet's USB connector. I have a couple of extension cables if I carry it out (still trying to figure out what solders where). The buttons for the power and brightness I plan to move as well, as having them at the back is a recipe for disaster if I wanted to put the tablet on my lap for example. Perhaps soldering wires to the switches? Ah! Speaking of switches I opened up the tablet today and found something interesting inside... The Huion K58 is VERY easy to disassemble. It has 12 philips screws on the underside. 7 are under round screwhole covers, 4 are under the outer side of each rectangle shaped "foot" and the last is under a little Huion sticker with Chinese on it (probably says "tested" or something). After removing these, the two halves just come apart. No evil industrial-strength double-sided tape or even clips moulded into the plastic (which is good quality ABS).

The sensor board is pretty small with the USB connector soldered onto the side. The active area is exactly 8" x 5" which makes it bigger than my LCD panel's active area by just a bit. What's more interesting is what's underneath the board...


* SANY0143.JPG (44.49 KB. 900x675 - viewed 407 times.)

As you can see, there's a metal sheet underneath just like the Wacoms! It's not thick, but feels a bit substantial. There's also a small conductive pad to touch the metal sheet and other foam pads to raise the board and keep it from shorting:


* SANY0152.JPG (40.11 KB. 900x675 - viewed 428 times.)


* SANY0159.JPG (95.33 KB. 900x675 - viewed 449 times.)


* SANY0155.JPG (56.42 KB. 900x675 - viewed 427 times.)


But another interesting thing is that the sensor board itself has pads for soldering on switches for buttons and extra LEDs... I wonder if they could be activated somehow by perhaps using different drivers... I'm not really bothered about that, but more so by my "dead pen" issue. Would definitely love to hear any suggestions on how to fix it...

« Last Edit: April 03, 2013, 08:11:21 PM by Chocochan » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 10:41:45 AM »

Great work so far, and just like Abeyance it's a bold move going for a non-Wacom tablet.

In reference to your pen not working correctly, I wonder if it might be a combination of the height of the pen above the tablet circuit being just on the edge of the 'Active' range coupled with interference generated by the LCD screen.

In a Wacom tablet when the pen is within a certain range of the circuit the pen provides an 'Active' signal to the circuit board to say 'I'm Here! Listen to me!' upon which the circuit changes it's state and begins communication. Trouble is that the range required to provide the 'Active' signal is slightly closer than the maximum working distance of the pen, this is because the communication signal between the circuit and pen has more power, so as long as the pen stays within range the tablet can remain active. The problem comes when you move the pen out of range and back again, but back to a height above the circuit which is just on the edge of the 'Active' height, if the pen cannot communicate to let the circuit know of its presence the circuit cannot respond. This is the point where interference from the screen can cause interuption to the process, a bit like a whispered conversation between 2 people in a small room while a third person shouts out jibberish.

Assuming that your tablet works in a similar way (as I would think it does), then this might be why you are having problems. If you can reduce the height then you might have more luck.

Hope that helps.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 10:44:51 AM by Aerendraca » Logged
Chocochan
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« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2013, 03:27:57 PM »

Hmmm, I'm not so sure it's related to the height. I am able to hover the pen fairly high AND move the cursor as its maximum reading distance is 15mm and the LCD panel is only about 5.3mm thick. So I have quite enough headroom and even more so when I can finally cut a hole in the tablet casing. The pen works flawlessly when the LCD panel is off even with the metal frame around it, so I keep believing it's a interference issue as it only gets blocked when it's on. I've even touched the pen tip right on top of the LCD and it still isn't recognised. Do you think that the active distance gets shorter when interference is in play, all the way to a point where the panel has to be removed?

I briefly got it to work when I turned off the LCD panel, turned it back on while the tablet was active. But once I raised the pen away and moved it back, it just died again like the tablet couldn't see it anymore. What I'm not sure about is if the interference is from the panel itself (or its backlight) or emitting from the PCB. I don't have much in shielding materials at the moment (except for aluminium tape), so I'm wondering if shielding the PCB would be a good start. I've been researching on materials and came across this website:

http://www.lessemf.com/magnetic_shielding.html#271

I've been speaking to them as I was originally going to grab a small amount of the magnetic shielding foil (as it's cheaper), but after communicating with Josh, he suggested a product called Finemet which is unfortunately more expensive. I could probably settle with just copper tape and whatnot, but even after reading other build logs, it seems that the interference intensity differs and doesn't always come from the same place. The plan was to make a small "pocket" out of a shielding material, insulate it and slide the LCD panel's PCB into it and seal it up except for slots for cables to pass through.

I also need to learn more about grounding and where I should ground to since this is a USB powered build. The LCD panel PCB has two grounding points (from what I can make out) and the tablet has one. Should all grounds go to the tablet or the LCD panel PCB? Is shielding supposed to be grounded too?

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abeyance
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 12:24:34 AM »

First, f'ing a! for using a non wacom board!! And hello to the forums! I think the problem you have is one I experienced early in my testing phase. Try offsetting the LCD from the sensor board. That weird power strip that is on the LCD to power the backlights may be what's cause the interference. Move the LCD sa far to the right as you can and leave just a tad bit of the sensor on the left side of the board. And then, just for shits and giggles, try leaving that metal plate from inside of that tablet under the sensor board. If this works you'll have a lot of shielding and grounding to do.

Frank
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 12:36:04 PM »

When you say the maximum reading height is 15mm, are you testing this by starting close to the circuit and raising the pen until it no longer works? A more accurate way is to start high and work down until the pen becomes active.

I'm not saying that height is your issue, I'm just basing the idea on what I have experienced with Wacom tablets, however since your tablet is non-Wacom perhaps the interference is the major issue here. It may well be the case that the communication frequency of your tablet is susceptible to the RF noise that your screen is outputting, if the screen is stopping the pen from working completely then your interference problem is major and I'm not sure that shielding alone with remedy this.

Abeyance's idea is worth a go, like most screens the little black circular monoliths on the screen circuit (inductors) resonate at high frequencies giving off RF noise, if you move this part of the circuit away from the tablet antennas then this might be enough to get you up an running.

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abeyance
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 01:14:17 PM »

If you look at the pictures of his LCD you can see he added an extension AFTER the LCD instead of replacing the cables that lead to the LCD bulbs (WTF are those called again?) The juice running thru that alone would give me pause. Like you and I said, moving the tablet away from that might produce some results. If that works then he needs to cut that out, rewire it and shield/ground it. And then there is that thick metal strip across the bottom of his board that also will prove to be a pain in the ass. It will need to be taken off I'm sure.

But these are just suggestions. I first tried doing my DIY with a realllllly nice 17 inch LG monitor with a power brick. I stripped and shielded it but got zip every time I powered the LCD up. Something about the sheets inside would not let that signal pass while there was juice running thru it. I really hope that this isn't his problem either.
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Chocochan
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 01:42:53 PM »

You'll be surprised to know abeyance, that I'm female... Wink

Anyway, I tried your approach and got the same result, so I took it a step further just now and decided to desolder the extension wires completely (they're actually from one of those molex adapters for a power supply to convert then for use with 3 pin PC fans, so I expected they would suit the intended purpose since a lower voltage would be passing through them) and tried it without any power to the backlight. Suffice to say, everyone's wrong! It didn't make the slightest bit of difference. It starts to work and then eventually cuts out. Almost like a charge is building up. The sound coming from the LCD panel was really weird, like how you'd imagine electricity sounds when it travels through a cable, so I was happy to solder them back and the whine isn't loud anymore so maybe it was always there and I never put my ear close enough to listen before.

I did think of going back into the LCD panel to see if I could remove the LED ribbon cable and replace it with something longer and shielded that I could push away, but now that I know it won't help, I'm not going to bother in case something goes wrong while disassembling it. I'd also just like to note that all tests were done with the tablet completely assembled. I never tried it disassembled but only took it apart once to show what it was like inside (some people are curious about the Huion tablets, so I thought I would help by showing its internals so they can be compared to the Wacoms). I suppose an option is to actually try the sensor board out of the casing and without the metal plate and see if that does something, but I have to go and make pizzas now...

P.S: What thick metal strip are you talking about? If you mean the metal frame around the LCD panel, it doesn't affect the signal coming from the pen at all (I tested with the panel off, but if it is a cause which I doubt, it can't really be removed without causing problems as it's holding the glass in position).

UPDATE: Well, I did a little more testing and finally had a result. Looks like the innocent metal frame that surrounds the LCD panel WAS the cause of the interference. Shocked See the face of my enemy!


* SANY0164.JPG (59.75 KB. 900x675 - viewed 478 times.)

I was thinking of removing it so that I could look at the LED backlight strip and found that the metal strip where it is couldn't come off (not without probably breaking something). Just then, a little whim called out from my head... "Try the screen without the metal frame and see what happens!" So I did. And lo and behold, the pen worked and stayed working! I moved it away, I moved it back and the tablet was still able to see it. The distance was short, but that may improve (tested with unopened tablet again).

It was jittery and had random clicking, but at least it was moving. Hopefully shielding and grounding can take care of that. So my new problem now is to find a safe, strong way of securing the glass and other sheets of whatever in the LCD panel together. Next week I'll need to find some durable thin plastic (probably best to use black), cut it into the same dimensions as the front of the frame and stick it down over where it originally was. Probably use some more of my 3M pressure-sensitive double sided tape to save money. Since the screwholes are still on the sides of the panel, I can use them with little plastic brackets to secure the LCD panel to the front half of the tablet casing. This will also ensure that the sheets inside stay in place.

At the moment, the LCD panel looks like this:


* SANY0165.JPG (61.76 KB. 900x675 - viewed 463 times.)

I used some painter's tape to keep the sheets in place for now (it's the safest as its adhesive doesn't pull stuff up like other tapes). Right now, I plan to desolder the extension wires and replace them with either longer ones of the same type or thin solid core kynar wire. There's a little gap where the edge of the PCB sat and was screwed down when it was folded and I can sit the wires in there meaning the LCD panel can finally lay flat. I'll probably go with the kynar wire as have a good amount of it (unfortunately not in red and black, but so what?). So far, this may turn into a nice build if I can get the jitter and clicking under control without frequency and resolution changing help. More to come!

« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 04:33:48 PM by Chocochan » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2013, 05:32:19 PM »

Excellent Chocochan! It doesn't surprise me at all you are a woman. In fact, I went to my engineer ex-wife to help me test and make sure I understood things like shielding and frequency. I use the 'he' for unidentified gendered persons as I use 'she' for babies. I hope I didn't offend. It was not my intention.

As far as the metal frame goes, no, I didn't see it in the pictures. But good find! I was referring to that metal strip along the back bottom of the LCD. I had to remove mine. Mine, thankfully wasn't there to hold anything in place but rather to dissipate heat! It may help with the jitter and random clicking. And you might want to give moving the LCD to the right again to see if it produces less jitter and clicking as well. But you're right, shielding and grounding will kill most of that.

Great job! I'm excited and can't wait to see the results! It gets lonely around here with all these pro Wacom types! Tongue

[edit]
I just found out that the Huion is a re branded UC Logic! And that their driver looks fantastic! I may have to see if it may have a chance of working with my Monoprice.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 05:43:49 PM by abeyance » Logged
Chocochan
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« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2013, 06:32:14 PM »

No offence taken. Smiley

The metal strip is actually on the top of the LCD. It's where the LED backlight strip is. The little ribbon cable comes out from it. I tried to lift it, but it refused to budge. There were a couple of screws there and even removing them didn't help. I've wanted to use a non Wacom ever since I sold my Intuos4. They were so big and to me not really worth the money if you know where to look. Not having an eraser doesn't bother me at all as I never used it. I mean whop the heck still uses eraser topped pencils these days? Anyway, the Huion is excellent. I've always wanted a white tablet (black is sooooo boring), so I contacted Huion and bought it directly from them here:

http://www.huion-tablet.com/

There's also a USB rechargeable pen too.


* 4007_s1.jpg (55.47 KB. 560x350 - viewed 408 times.)

The K58 comes with one. You can just charge it up with the included cable without worrying about the weight of batteries or some flimsy terminals that could break. It lasts ages too as it turns itself off when not in use and the best part is if you need another one it's just $20! The nibs are cheap too. Take that Wacom! The amazing thing is how well they actually work. People have commented on how fine they can make lines and how responsive the tablets are. The driver is surprisingly good. One thing about the drivers is the "scope" tab.


* Image003.jpg (41.55 KB. 364x508 - viewed 419 times.)

 It allows you to set how big you want the active area to be and even the offset of the pen, which should be great when calibrating. You just drag the box to the size you want or type in the length and width if you want to be more precise:


* Image004.jpg (36.29 KB. 356x507 - viewed 445 times.)

I haven't used the tablet much for drawing, but I did mess with it a bit and found it was more than perfect for my needs. As for UC Logic rebranding, I don't think they are. After looking at both websites, none of the UC Logic ones appear on the Huion website, so I think they are a company all their own, but some accessories (and drivers) may be compatible. Here's the UC Logic one:

http://www.uc-logic.com/en/default.php

The drivers come up as this and not UC Logic:


* Image005.jpg (35.45 KB. 416x464 - viewed 408 times.)

It's interesting if they use the same tech or not, but regardless of that, it only cost me... well, let me save that until when/if my build gets finished. Wink

« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 06:37:50 PM by Chocochan » Logged
abeyance
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« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2013, 10:31:36 PM »

Here is my buddy Ray (he started building the first non wacom cintiq that I ran into) reviewing your sleek tablet: http://frenden.tumblr.com/post/44243131746/huion-10x6-tablet-unboxing-using-the-same

Huion drivers work with my Monoprice tablet! And while I can't find info from Huion about using UC Logic digitizer, I trust Ray. He uses the pen for his Yiynova (which I will be getting) and like I said the drivers are compatible. Tongue Wish I would've heard of this manufacturer before I bought my Monoprice, but rest assured my next tablet will be from Huion. Come on 12x9 version!!

[edit]
BTW, I threw my cintiq together for less than $120 total. Of course I had to build my own enclosure. I didn't take my tablet apart. I sandwiched everything in my home brew case. And just to give myself even more grief I just found this http://www.huion-tablet.com/about/press.php?id=23 a 19 inch drawing monitor for $350?! Brb need to go find my razor and /wrists
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 10:48:40 PM by abeyance » Logged
Chocochan
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2013, 11:57:46 PM »

Ray's one is different from mine:

http://www.huion-tablet.com/product/product.php?sku=1004

Mine is this one but in white:

http://www.huion-tablet.com/product/product.php?sku=1012

Be careful with the Yiynovas... I bought one it was was absolute crap. I really hated it that I took it apart to scavenge what I could and then threw the rest away. The parallax is awful because the glass is so thick and the screen has terrible viewing angles. I was stupid enough to buy what they called the latest version (which was wireless which was useless as it was so laggy and the battery ran out way too fast). I lost £500 that way and vowed to build my DIY cintiq the way I wanted it. There is NO LCD tablet on the market that is truly worth the money. Every single one has flaws for their huge cost, which is why I would prefer to build my own and work with it. I would also have the benefit of knowing how it works inside and out and can repair it myself cheaply.

Don't bother slashing your wrists, how will you draw if you do? Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 12:04:01 AM by Chocochan » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2013, 05:45:59 PM »

Time for an update! I was planning to buy something to attach round the front of the LCD in order to hold all the sheets in since I removed the metal frame, but I realise that it's not that big a problem. I have two choices:

1. Just slap some electrical tape (black) round it as a sort of frame or,
2. Buy some thin single sided foam tape and use that so when I attach it to the front of the casing it has a bit of protection.

I think I may go with 2 and leave 1 as a backup in case I can't find a suitable tape (meaning one that is thin enough). But here's the real news I have two new problems.

PROBLEM 5:

Can't believe I never noticed this, but there's no way I can fit the LCD into the tablet's casing. Why? Look at this (blurry 'cause I was too lazy to take another) picture:


* SANY0168.JPG (52.08 KB. 900x675 - viewed 484 times.)

The stupid LCD PCB when folded out is too low for the Huion casing. Angry I didn't want to make a housing to slide the tablet into as I find I wanted the whole thing to be compact and lightweight, especially since it'll be all USB powered. So I'm going to have to make a new case for it (in white ABS of course). Luckily the sensor board is so small it'll end up being smaller which is a huge plus. And so, I was messing with the LCD and tablet today and tried some tests again. This time with the tablet OPEN. I have a good amount of reading height though it tends to get really jittery the further I move the pen away.

However, near the top of the LCD is still an issue with jitter and random clicks. I think the source is still that wretched metal strip where the LED strip is hiding itself. I thought to myself "Enough is enough! It's gotta go!" So I took my tools and worked on removing said metal strip. The double sided tape there is so like the notorious Wacom tape. It's stupidly strong. And for good reason. I really fought with it thinking all the time, "Will I break it and ruin my entire build since I can't find another of these USB monitors in the UK?" (Doublesight monitors are only available in the US and they're not cheap either. I don't know where the guy I bought mine from got them as he had more than one.)

...

Yeah... so, what happened? Well... I kinda...

GOT IT OFF! And I believe nothing got broken either (from what I could see) Yay! Grin However, it unlocked the path to a new problem:

PROBLEM 6:

The LED strip is stuck with some more of that evil tape inside the metal U-shaped bracket! :'( I thought "How the heck am I gonna get that out without destroying the LEDs?" Well, I took my little blade and a pointed dental tool and experimented. I was able to lift the ends of the strip, but couldn't go any further due to the length of the strip. So I remembered a little secret among us traditional artists... a secret I still had some of. It's called Zest-It (my bottle looks like this but has a dropper top and lid instead of just a standard screw top one.):


* zPARB50ml100dpi.jpg (15.84 KB. 189x354 - viewed 369 times.)

It's a fantastic alternative to turpentine and white spirit when oil painting and is also great with oil based pencils like the Prismacolor brand (which are great, but expensive). It has an orangey scent as it contains citrus oil (but I've learned they now do a citrus free version which apparently has more "bite" to it.), but it works VERY well. You can learn more about it here (it's available in the US and UK too!):

http://www.zest-it.com/zest-it.htm

But you're probably thinking one or both of these things:

1. The whole point of making a DIY Cintiq is to paint DIGITALLY! I don't care about traditional painting!
2. What the heck does this have to do with the problem you have?

Well, a side effect of how well it works diluting oils is that it will dissolve those annoying tape adhesives! That's right! If you drip a bit over some tape or tape residue and leave it for a while, it'll lift right up and get all gummy like chewing gum. With a tissue you can just wipe it away! And because Zest-It contains no water based ingredients, it's safe to use on electronics too. So that's what I did. Inside the ends of the LED strip I raised up, I dripped some Zest-It and left it while I typed this update. So far everything looks like this:


* SANY0173.JPG (65.64 KB. 900x675 - viewed 434 times.)

Will the Zest-It loosen the tape? Will it kill the LEDs?? Did I already kill the LEDs on the ends I raised up??? Find out next time... Wink

« Last Edit: April 03, 2013, 08:32:29 PM by Chocochan » Logged
Chocochan
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« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2013, 08:38:39 PM »

Piece of cake...


* SANY0174.JPG (33.4 KB. 900x675 - viewed 429 times.)


* SANY0175.JPG (46.54 KB. 900x675 - viewed 511 times.)

Once I get something to stick round the front and to keep the LED strip flat and flush, I'll get back to testing and if all goes well, grounding (I think I understand what to do and how to do it now) and shielding (if I hear back from 3M that is). Then we'll see what's what with my case design! Wink

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profaldo
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« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2013, 08:38:41 AM »

For your case - could you move everything up by an inch - that way tablet PCB and the monitor (with its extended PCB) all fit into the original casing?

That might require grinding off part of the base of the original casing and reworking the screws - but you no longer have to make a new case.
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Chocochan
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« Reply #14 on: April 04, 2013, 03:49:44 PM »

For your case - could you move everything up by an inch - that way tablet PCB and the monitor (with its extended PCB) all fit into the original casing?

That might require grinding off part of the base of the original casing and reworking the screws - but you no longer have to make a new case.


I did think about modifying the original casing, but I don't know if I'd do that. I would have to check and see if the surface mounted LED on the tablet's sensor board would still be visible through that little window thingy. I'd like to keep that as extra assurance that the the signal is being picked up (and for bling Tongue). I could just cut the bottom curved part of the casing off and find some white ABS to extend it. At least that way all the screw holes will be in the same places. With the right solvent type adhesive and a lot of sanding and polishing, I might be able to pull it off. Of course I have no idea if the LCD controller board will even fit in there with everything yet!

The inside of the top half has like a moulded grid to push everything together. I think that's what it does. I don't think trimming them will make much difference as they are around 2mm deep and the LCD is around 5.3mm and don't even get me started on how to measure the controller board with all those things on it sticking up! I could make the casing wider vertically to slot it in on the same level with everything else (above the sensor board, probably shielded), or make the casing deeper and pop it behind the metal sheet (obviously shielded). What to do, what to do...
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