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Author Topic: Serenitiq 2 - Wacom Intuos 4 L + Rozsnyo DP2MBPR controller + LTN154YL01  (Read 41009 times)
Aerendraca
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« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2014, 11:33:05 PM »

It's been a couple of weeks since I last posted on my thread, so time for a progress report.

Still not decided on a screen for this project yet but it looks like the LP156WF4-SLB* is off the cards as they're non existent - even in China apparently - so I'm currently rethinking this and possibly looking at going for an LP154WF* 15.4" panel now but this means I'm going to need a programmer from NJY so that I can use it, not sure about this yet and definitely need to give it more thought.

However, I have received the Cooler Master U3 stand and some other bits and pieces for later in the build, but for now here's some photos of the stand with the tablet and boxed LVDS controller (semi attached with double sided tape mock-up style):


* Serenitiq2 001.jpg (182.21 KB. 490x367 - viewed 604 times.)



* Serenitiq2 002.jpg (148.47 KB. 520x358 - viewed 495 times.)


I'm pleased to say that so far my CAD skills are representing actual world realities - looking good I think. Also, I really recommend the U3 laptop stand for a slight incline on the tablet (about 8degrees), makes for a better feel when drawing; my opinion of course but I really do prefer it!

« Last Edit: February 21, 2014, 12:29:18 AM by Aerendraca » Logged
thatcomicsguy
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« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2014, 07:11:39 PM »

This is looking really elegant.

Nice work!

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Aerendraca
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« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2014, 02:43:54 PM »

Well I've been busy on this project in the background working on a shortcut key controller so I don't have to use the Wacom buttons on the I4 or my keyboard. Mostly this has been just tinkering with ideas and purchasing small components so I don't have anything really to report here at the moment.

I can say that the plan is to have a single large aluminium knob as the main control with a tactile switch built into the z-axis of the knob (push down), and 4 additional tactile switches inbuilt at the north,east, south, and west positions (in x and y axis). Surrounding the knob will be an array of NeoPixel LEDS to show relative position information and configuration status based on LED colour - Just waiting on the NeoPixel ring to show up. In addition to the knob I also intend to have keyboard style keys (Cherry Black switches) in easy reach of the little, ring, and middle fingers of my left hand, and all crafted lovingly from some nice wood (perhaps Oak, not sure yet).

With regards to my screen search I have been inspired by Bumhee34's beautiful build based around the Ipad3 Retina screen and decided to drop my plans for using the LP156WF4 (which I just can't find) and push the boat out and use the Macbook Pro Retina A1398 15.4" panel; Given the price of these things I'm going to need to save up for a bit first though. As I'm sure a lot of you probably already know Apple tend to make there products very difficult to take apart - with the Retina panel being no exception -  beyond this though Apple decided not to give this panel a chassis of its own at all and instead build the screen into the chassis of the Macbook lid. Essentially what this means is that you have two options with this screen: 1.Buy the complete Macbook lid/screen combo for megabucks, or 2.Buy just the TFT (ie no backlight, diffusers, light guide, no reflectors) - still quite expensive. I have opted for the second option meaning that I will need to make my own backlight setup for this panel further complicating things.

On a plus note though, at my new job there is a compound where old electronics go to die, and in said compound I discovered that someone had chucked out an Samsung LTN154AT10-T01 with a smashed beyond smashed screen on it. I picked up the screen, removed the tft and inside was an immaculate set of diffuser/reflector films and a mint light guide - Fate? I think so. It was obvious on inspection that this panel was a ccfl panel and infact (somewhat surprisingly given the state of the panel chassis) the ccfl was in one piece! The great thing about this amazing find was that the CCFL was mounted on the top edge of the panel (where the TCON circuitry resides) which by happy coincidence is exactly where the WLEDs of the Pro Retina screen also reside, Awesome!!!

The next problem was to find somewhere to get hold of the WLEDs for the Retina panel. Eventually I stumbled across a guy on ebay based in Taiwan selling Macbook Pro parts who, I discovered to my delight, was selling the A1398 WLEDs, so I bought a set from him for a very reasonable £15; Should be here in a couple of weeks I think, Nice! So I now have the backlight assembly and the WLEDs for the actual retina screen.

But, how does one control such a panel? Well there's this genius guy called Daniel (and his team of people?) over at http://dp2mbpr.rozsnyo.com/ that have worked on, and successfully produced, a controller that can drive the screen via a display port connection (ie Display Port 2 Mac Book Pro Retina - DP2MBPR get it!). Anyway, they have a batch of these things in production, of which I have registered my interest in purchasing one. They cost a pretty hefty $149 (£90ish) but given the effort that must have gone into this and the general passion for the project (check out the website) I think it's probably just about worth it.

As an alternative, if you fancied sending of the gerber files and having the boards manufactured yourself, there is another guy called Mike over at Mike Mods (http://mikesmods.com/mm-wp/?page_id=11) who had done the same thing open sourcing the technical details of the controller board with all required files provided; He's another freaking genius. P.s His blogs make for a great read.

All being well with this project, the intention is therefore to have a screamingly hot 2880x1800 resolution 15.4" IPS panel at the heart of my Intuos 4 with a (hopefully) well configured bespoke shortcut key controller. I just love building things! Wish me luck!!  Wink
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 02:29:41 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2014, 11:37:45 AM »

Macbook Pro Retina WLED Strip arrived this morning and matched up perfectly with the light guide and diffuser sheets from the salvaged LTN154AT10-T01 (Pictured below):


* WP_20140304_002.jpg (249.84 KB. 766x496 - viewed 637 times.)


*Note* Actually that WLED strip isn't technically from the LAN154YL01 panel since this panel has not backlight strip (this was kind of the whole point of doing it this way), perhaps I should have written that it belonged to the Apple Macbook Pro Retina Chassis?

Since I don't have the controller or the screen yet I can't test the backlight but I'm sure it's fine; Perhaps I could have a probe with it later since Mike of MikesMods and Daniel from Rozsnyo have provided enough info to give this a go.

Right, off to order the controller.  Smiley

« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 02:29:50 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2014, 02:27:28 PM »

One controller ordered. Exciting. Grin
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 02:30:41 PM by Aerendraca » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2014, 01:45:05 PM »

One controller received!  Grin


* DP2MBPR A01A.jpg (153.53 KB. 640x480 - viewed 714 times.)


* DP2MBPR A02A.jpg (109.76 KB. 640x480 - viewed 512 times.)


* DP2MBPR A03A.jpg (112.48 KB. 640x480 - viewed 594 times.)

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thatcomicsguy
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« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2014, 10:58:19 PM »

Wow!  A retina 15" project?

If you get this working, it will be a giant leap forward for DIY kind everywhere.

Fingers crossed, man!
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2014, 12:21:08 AM »

Fingers crossed for sure, but I have confidence (perhaps foolishly). I've broken enough panels now to tread very carefully with this build, last thing i want is to break a retina panel. It's likely going to be a couple of months before i get the lcd as the coming weeks are going to be expensive what with a friends wedding and holiday coming up, however when i do get it i will do one test - which i will post the results of here - then the screen and controller will be measured for CAD purposes and put safely away until the enclosure is complete.

like I've said before, this project will be a slow burner; patience is key but temptation lurks to trip us up. I need to stay on the right side of patience.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 12:22:41 AM by Aerendraca » Logged
bumhee34
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« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2014, 05:26:57 AM »

I was looking for the backlight unit(BLU) for retina panel, and you found that BLU from LTN154AT10-T01 is well matched.
But, before test with real panel, we do not know whether it is really matched well.
I hope that the diffuser should be long enough in y-axis, or it will show you curtain-shape light to your panel.
Usually, the diffuser of CCFL BLU is shorter than LED BLU, leading to curtain-shape light when we mod CCFL BLU into WLED BLU.
If there is such a phenomena, then you should change the BLU.
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2014, 11:17:31 AM »

Its a good point actually, although the LED strip itself had the diodes spaced closer than i have ever seen on any screen, there's 96 LEDs over the 330mm width!

If i do find this to be a problem I shall contact the guy that sold me the LEDs and see if he still has the BLU for the MBPR, but i don't expect it to be a problem given the Led density.
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Aerendraca
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« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2014, 10:42:49 PM »

Well I thought it was time to write a bit about what I've been up to with this build seeing as I scan the forums on more or less a daily basis without having done so for a while.

First up, I still haven't got the retina screen yet, these past weeks have been hitting my wallet pretty hard so this is on the back foot for the foreseeable future. Unfortunately this has meant that designing the casing has also had to take a back seat as I don't have the dimensions for the panel and I want to get a feel for it prior to committing to a concept. Hopefully I should have one by the end of July.

Ok, so what have I been up to?

Some time ago I think I mentioned that I was wanting to make a bespoke shortcut-key keypad for use in photoshop, however I was considering this ambitiously with little to no knowledge of how I might go about creating such a device. After many hours of trawling webpages to see if something existed that I could hack to do what I wanted, I finally gave up on hacking/modding to achieve my goals and took a leap into designing something from scratch.

During my intensive obsessive web browsing I was subtly seduced by a device called the ErgoDox ergonomic keyboard, a two part keyboard that has a dedicated keypad for each hand with keys that are positioned to make typing (and playing games) easier and quicker. A first glance and I was enamored. I began thinking about how I could incorporate the keypads into my build in a way that would give me simple quick access to shortcut-keys more efficiently. One small thing that I overlooked with the ErgoDox was the price and availability; turns out these things are expensive and can only be obtained through group-buy website Massdrop; a site that makes products available for sale based on their forums demand and offers a reduced price once a target number of people have committed to buy. This essentially means that the ErgoDox may not even be available to purchase for months until enough interest has been registered, and that once the initial interest has been registered, items are held in an open status while committed purchasers make their pledges meaning that this whole thing can take months from conception to delivery. This would be an expensive faff for something that probably wouldn't work for me anyway.

With the ErgoDox off the table I started looking into the hardware it uses and the firmware that supports it; turns out all this stuff is freely available as what appears to be a semi-opensource project - here: http://ergodox.org/Downloads.aspx

So I had a bit of a think about it and decided that I could try to manufacture a bespoke keypad taking some of the influences of this product while using the information for reference. After careful consideration of how I draw and where my free hand sits during drawing I came up with the following concept:


* Design 003.jpg (73.96 KB. 630x336 - viewed 353 times.)


Orange keys are key set modifiers. The intention here is that they can be used to toggle the grey and black keys through 4 banks giving a total of 160 shortcut keys.

The Grey keys are to be used for incremented brush favorites, for example they may be used to increment the brush size, flow amount, or brush opacity from 1 through 100 in steps; maybe something like 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 40, 80, 100.

The Black keys will be standard single key shortcut keys.

The Black central larger key is the 'Spacebar'.

The Green, Blue, and Red keys are modifier keys - Green='Shift', Blue='Alt', Red='Ctrl'. There are a set of modifiers on each side to make pressing combination keys more comfortable while not limiting where combinations can be positioned on the keypad.




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Aerendraca
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« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2014, 11:30:37 PM »

So the plan has been set and a target laid out, next up is the creation of such a device. A quick note here - This is still a work in progress but initial tests are showing some promise.

My keypad will be based around the Arduino Leonardo, a microcontroller that has USB capability out of the box with a decent set of USB communication examples readily included in the Arduino IDE.

There are 51 keys on my design and far less pins than that free on the Arduino, meaning that some kind of electronics trickery must be used to connect the keys to the Arduino. This takes place via I2C through an MCP23016 16bit parallel to serial chip, with the keys connected to it in an 8x8 array for a total of 64 possible keys (though only 51 will actually be used).

I initially had a small 2x2 grid setup on a breadboard connected to the MCP23016 to test the concept, but this quickly became messy and evident that an 8x8 grid would be unreasonable to work with. I was therefore forced to create a more permanent protoboard solution which is where I came up with this little beauty:


* KeyPadProtoboard.jpg (299.15 KB. 816x612 - viewed 382 times.)


Those with keen eyes might notice that there are only eight keys on this board; an 8x1 array whats up with that? Well, the eight keys on the board represent one column of an 8x8 array, and to the right of the keys is an eight DIP switch module; the DIP switches allow me to select which row I wish to simulate giving me access to the whole 64keys! This is great because it keeps things simple and small and easy to test without being cluttering and confusing.

So far I have this proto-keypad working in a basic capacity where I can use it as a very simple computer keyboard allowing 8 simultaneous key presses at once; handy since this means I can flip all the DIP switches and check each row is working correctly - All works well.

The only thing I'm struggling with at the moment is the speed at which the keys can be pressed in rapid succession. Whilst not unusable this may become annoying later on so I consider this a problem that needs sorting before I expand on what I have so far. Once I have worked out where the problem lays I will begin looking into how to assign modifier keys and key set modifiers, but this may take some time since I'm no programmer and I'm pretty much teaching myself this stuff as I go along.

I have not gone into any detail on how I've got this working yet, this is deliberate since it would just be garbled nonsense while I find my feet, however I fully intend on providing resources and code once I have this keypad up and running fully. For now though, that's it, this is where I'm at with my build.   

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thp777
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« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2014, 12:19:26 AM »

might be a cheaper option to just modify a belkin nostromo for a macroable keypad like one of my previous projects. Then you already have good software to go along with it. http://geekhack.org/index.php?topic=20578.30. I use mine for 3ds max shortcuts and macros and used to use it for world of warcraft.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 12:24:30 AM by thp777 » Logged
Aerendraca
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« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2014, 11:26:29 AM »

I'm not sure about the Nostromo route being cheaper, they're £50 off the bat, and they don't have enough keys for me really. Besides, I'm more of a creator than an artist and I love taking on projects and pushing my abilities. I also have a huge box of salvaged equipment to rip into keeping my costs down.

I read through your blog on the geekhack forums and it would seem you are one ambitious person. I love your ideas and your CAD designs (solidworks?), but implementing these into a final product is going to be a heck of a task not to mention costly - especially the design with the android screens, but hats off to you and best of luck.

As for this project, I was lucky enough to source two vintage keyboards for nothing, one with Alps switches, and the other with Cherry blacks. Incidentally I'm also a geekhack forum member (mostly just lurking), and following this controller project I will be embarking on a full size mechanical keyboard based around the Teensy to match.

I see you've decided to use the Teensy in your controller project, what was the reason for the switch? Are you a savvy programmer? Perhaps I could pick your brains over some code at some point.

« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 11:34:23 AM by Aerendraca » Logged
thp777
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« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2014, 05:47:58 PM »

That one kinda got put on the backburner but i decided to switch to the teensy because i already have a few of them laying around. as for programming i usually modify existing code or pick pieces from different ones but i am getting better. im alot better on the hardware side of things.
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