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Question: Which voltage to get?
5v and step it down somehow - 0 (0%)
3v and be done with it. - 0 (0%)
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Author Topic: Pro Micro advice...  (Read 2516 times)
ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2016, 07:10:17 PM »

Here are some images, if you'd like something more let me know. I've soldered and resoldered this thing too many times to count with varying degrees of decent looking soldering joints but the outcome after the first test has been the same.

Here's an short album of photos: http://imgur.com/a/hHeQ7
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Pesho
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« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2016, 09:24:39 PM »

Judging from the picture i'd say you have a few cold solder joints, especially at GND which is hanging by a few threads with a way-too-large solderblob. It may have even gotten disconnected at this point and thats why it doesn't work anymore - teensy works, but digitizer isn't getting any signal. You should try redoing the 4 connections. Not sure how you're doing it, but proper technique is to thread the wire through the eyelet, place the soldering iron tip at the area and then stick the tin solder in there, all for no more than 5 seconds or so. It's not that difficult, you can refer to this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYWwKe8f2kc
« Last Edit: May 22, 2016, 09:31:05 PM by Pesho » Logged
ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2016, 11:01:35 PM »

Yeah, this was kind of a last ditch effort this last time. Not my finest work. I've tried soldering it as strands like in this picture, in shorter strands the first time (when it kind of worked) and all the other times I ran the wires through the holes hooked the holes then twisted them then soldered the holes. All resulted in the same behavior. I think maybe I screwed up the board somewhere along the way.

I've tried to have proper technique, it never really works for me unfortunately. The solder seems to love my soldering iron and doesn't want to stick to the board so I have to continuously fight with it. I've seen other soldering techniques where they heat the board first then dot the solder on the board, I don't understand this either. How do they know they aren't overheating the board in the first place?
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Pesho
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« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2016, 11:37:59 PM »

It's not so much about heating the board itself, rather it's about placing the iron in the required area so that the solder starts melting immediately as soon as you put it there. The reason solder refuses to stick is because a fine layer of oxide forms on every copper surface as soon as it's exposed to air. It's like grease and water.



Exposing copper to the air is inevitable, this is why soldering wire usually has a core of rosin in the center which breaks down the oxide layer and helps the tin to bond to the copper. You can't really melt some solder onto the iron and then apply it because this way all the rosin evaporates (as fumes) and you're left with pure Tin/Lead alloy which will have a hard time bonding. Even rubbing an exposed copper wire with your fingers is enough to contaminate it with grease and make it repel the solder. For this you either use flux (a liquid that breaks down oxide layers and contaminants), or you rely on the rosin core that's already in the wire.


Cross-section of solder

The heat applied to the board varies a lot with the iron's temperature setting, surface area and size (thermal capacity) of the tip you're using. General rule of thumb is that "5 seconds or so" is enough and within the limits of what the board can usually handle. Also, the more solder you deposit the harder it's going to be to melt it because as the blob grows, so does its thermal capacity - it will act as a heatsink. If it gets too large, best thing to do is remove it (by scooting it away, or using copper-braid) and try again.

Hope this info helps!
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ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2016, 02:51:18 AM »

Thank you Pesho I appreciate your help. I will try to give the board a once over cleaning with some alcohol and try to solder the wires again in a day or two. I'm doubtful that the issue now is completely due to my admittedly shoddy soldering job since my first shot at soldering it gave at least some kind of response. If this is the issue then I guess we can blame that on beginner's luck Wink
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Ertew
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« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2016, 07:52:10 PM »

1) In Windows, You don't need USB drivers for Wacom tablets and Atmega running WaxBee emulation. That's because Waxom/WaxBee use HID class.
If windows recognize Your Teensy/Pro Micro/etc. as Wacom, then Atmega working correctly and communicating via USB without problems.
Picture http://i.imgur.com/vuQdI6i.jpg looks good. In my opinion everything OK with Atmega.

2) You need drivers for OS (from Wacom) to detect what type of tablet You connect and to talk with OS. If You have the right version, windows detect Your tablet and show TabletPC options. Also Wacom software show tablet on list and allow You to configure it.

3) If first two steps are OK and digitizer doesn't respond (cursor doesn't move), You have problem with digitizer or with connection between digitizer and board.
It's very rare to destroy single pin on Atmega without destroying whole chip. But It's easy to destroy pad on PCB with too high temperature. Next, If You don't have enough soldering skills, You may make poor quality solder joints.  Picture http://i.imgur.com/OPSgVw1.jpg have bad quality but in my opinion You may have problem with GND and maybe with VCC too.
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ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2016, 10:13:28 PM »

Hi Ertew. Problems 1 and 2 are cleared as you can see Device Manager picks it up and the Wacom drivers pick up the tablet as well.

You state as with Pesho that the Soldering joints are most likely the issue. I'm guessing that this means if I desolder everything again then Teensy should still show up in Device Manager and the Wacom drivers should still register the tablet and the sole issue is with the connectivity between the wires and the tablet screen itself?

One issue is that I don't even know if the tablet screens are working correctly themselves. I bought two of them, supposedly taken from working computers. I would say that they must work to some extent at least given that they tracked the cursor the first time I tried. If nothing else I'll use this teensy board as something to practice soldering on Smiley
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Ertew
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« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2016, 10:49:17 PM »

As far as I know (true for ISDv4 templates), WaxBee working exactly the same when You have only Teensy/Pro Micro or when You have that board with digitizer connected. In both cases it's like tablet without pen.
So YES. If You not destroy Teensy while desoldering wires, it must work exactly the same.

How to test the digitizer?
1) Buy/borrow usb->serial adapter. Ideal would be usb to ttl like this:
http://kaushleshchandel.com/wordpress/?p=194
http://www.amazon.com/GearMo%C2%AE-Header-TTL-232R-3V3-Windows-Support/dp/B004LBXO2A
http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/3-3v-signal-level-cp2102-usb_705518325.html
Or use any older arduino board with usb->serial converter on board (with blank sketch inside uC).
You need to provide good supply voltage for digitizer and connect TX pin from digitizer to RX pin on serial converter (or TX pin on arduino because TX of uC is connected to RX of usb->serial converter).
When You run serial terminal software and connect to that serial port, You should receive a lot of wired characters as long as You have pen near surface.
*this is bad idea to connect only VCC, GND and TX of digitizer, but on my setup this is enough to test digitizer.

2) Use LEDs (with proper serial resistors) to check communication on TX line and maybe on proximate output pin (change state when pen is in range). More info about pinout here:
http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?topic=1870.msg13784#msg13784
http://forum.bongofish.co.uk/index.php?topic=1754.msg12587#msg12587

Btw, You should measure voltage and supply current for digitizer. Do You have multimeter?
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Pesho
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« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2016, 09:28:56 PM »

If its going to be used in Windows, then a USB-UART board would only be useful for testing, not much else.
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ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #24 on: May 24, 2016, 11:08:57 PM »

Well, I soldered it again. I think this is the 5th or 6th time now. And I checked voltage with a multimeter. One probe on ground I checked VCC and the others. All supplied 3.3v.

Update: I decided to try installing the drivers on an old Windows XP computer I have. Same response. Nothing. >:|
« Last Edit: May 25, 2016, 05:06:20 AM by ThinWhiteDuke » Logged
bernard
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« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2016, 06:02:26 AM »

You should install the virtual serial port .hex to troubleshoot this. (it is like a UART-USB converter, but using the same pro micro setup). This will tell you if anything is being sent on the serial port. There are posts and info about doing that.  Maybe simply the baud rate is wrong.

In anyway, for ISDV4 emulation, you have to go through that to get the max X/Y sizes and configure WaxBer else you will not get the good active area.
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ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2016, 07:03:15 AM »

I will try to find these tutorials and get back to you, probly tomorrow. I have what should be the max x/y sizes from the tutorial I posted from this site using the same screen and digitizer board. Seems like it should work. But doesn't. I'll keep trying.

edit: Right now I can add that within the wacom tools, going to about -> Diagnose. Everything is grayed out except pen pressure. But pen pressure doesn't do anything either.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2016, 08:35:34 AM by ThinWhiteDuke » Logged
Ertew
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« Reply #27 on: May 28, 2016, 08:27:56 PM »

ThinWhiteDuke, voltage at Your Teensy in OK. Please check voltages at RX and TX pins of Teensy and on VCC, GND, RX and TX at the digitizer (bring some needles and probe to digitizer connector).
If You have 3.3v between VCC and GND at the digitizer board and 3.3v between RX/TX and any GND, that soldering should be OK. If any voltage missing, you may have problem there.

If voltages are OK, next that You can try: cut VCC connection between Teensy and digitizer and connect multimeter to measure current in that cable. It should be something between 5 and 100mA and changing depend on what digitizer working.
For example my digitizer draw about:
- 10mA in standby (no pen),
- 20mA when working (pen near surface),
- 30mA for about 2s after pen was removed, probably that's 'searching for a pen' mode.
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ThinWhiteDuke
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« Reply #28 on: May 28, 2016, 09:59:20 PM »

Hi Ertew, are you wanting me to check them while it's plugged into the digitizer board? Or unplugged from the digitzer board and stick needles in the connector holes?
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Ertew
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« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2016, 10:08:45 PM »

For testing supply voltage (3.3v and gnd) both options are OK.
For test voltages on RX/TX everything should be connected together. That's because TX give logic 1 at idle while RX is just input and may floating without connected to TX.
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