Bongofish
October 19, 2019, 09:19:42 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: You can attach photos hosted by the forum rather than using an external image hosting site, this means they will stay forever and not disappear after a year or two.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Hey..  (Read 5497 times)
keyshi
New Poster
*
Posts: 2


View Profile
« on: December 21, 2006, 07:52:19 AM »

Hey, im looking to make my own Cintiq but im just wondering, what are some "good" 9x12 Tablets? im trying to get one used to save some money so far iv been leaning towards Wacom intuos ones, but they are a tad pricey and are hard to find(used).

so just wondering, what are some brands that work good? I would like pressure sensitivity and its for drawing, so an acceptable amount of accuracy also. thanks alot, i look forward to posting my build soon I hope Tongue
Logged
SchwarzerPrinz
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 52


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2006, 01:50:52 PM »

Hello there!

Check this one: Aiptek Hyper Pen 12000U
12'' x 9'' drawing area and they are sold frequently as used items on ebay. I've ordered one of these myself, but i can't tell you how good these are compared to Wacom tablets. Maybe some people around here have some experience with both Wacom and Aiptek tablets?
Logged

Drewid
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2290


wielder of electric crayons


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2006, 03:02:27 PM »

Must be possible to find specs for pressure levels and resolution. Not that that will tell you very much about how it feels.
Logged

Games work site:  Drewnorthcott.co.uk
Personal site: Bongofish.co.uk
SchwarzerPrinz
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 52


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2006, 04:31:52 PM »

I gathered some information from the official websites:
ManufacturerAiptek Wacom
ProductHyper Pen 12000UIntuos 3 9x12
Active Area12'' x 9''12'' x 9''
Pressure Levels5121024
Resolution3048 lpi5080 lpi
Accuracy0.02''0.01''
Max. height0.31''No official data, Drew's (not the same product, but same product group) manages 0.35''
Price79.99$ refurbished with 11 months of warranty449.95$ new
Now first of all you see at once that the Hyper Pen is outclassed by the Intuos: Higher resolution, double pressure levels and double pen accuracy. The main question is: How good are you at drawing stuff, respectively are you going to use that board for work or for fun? To speak for myself, i'm going for fun and chose a used Hyper Pen at Ebay.

Drew has proven that you can get a Wacom 12 x 12 board for free. It might be tricky to do that trick again, but generally you can get things at market places a) fast, b) in good condition or c) cheap; and in most cases you can only match two of these. So take your time and you might find a good Wacom board at a reasonable price.
Logged

Drewid
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2290


wielder of electric crayons


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2006, 05:20:26 PM »

BUT that aiptek beats my 12x12 on both res and pressure levels, and it's not just the data coming out that matters but how the drivers handle it.

soooooo.   There's no real way of caomaping tablets except by trying it.
Logged

Games work site:  Drewnorthcott.co.uk
Personal site: Bongofish.co.uk
SchwarzerPrinz
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 52


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2006, 05:27:48 PM »

 Huh

Which board do you own, then? Thought it was an Intuos?
Logged

Drewid
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2290


wielder of electric crayons


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2006, 05:28:48 PM »

yep but it's a 1 not a 3.


well I think it's the same as a 1.  it's an ultrapad2/artpad/digitizer2
Logged

Games work site:  Drewnorthcott.co.uk
Personal site: Bongofish.co.uk
nathansmith
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 35


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2006, 09:03:55 PM »

Actually, the price is $99 refurbished with a 1 month warranty. A longer warranty costs additional money.

I also purchased an Aiptek hyperpen 12000U direct from Aiptek and it just arrived last night. So far, I have mixed feelings about it. I've never used a tablet before, so I don't really have anything to compare it to. I, like SchwarzerPrinz, am planning on using my hybrid for fun, so I suppose that the issues aren't a huge deal, but it would be nice if they didn't exist. Here's what I've discovered so far:

  • The software that comes with the tablet is pretty hoakey. The installer and everything around the driver CD seem as though they were written in the late 90's. It just leaves an impression of 'cheap'.
  • The tablet draws straight horizontal and vertical lines, but diagonal lines may have some wiggles in them (see attached image), even when using a non-metalic straight edge.
  • The documentation that comes with the tablet is written in terrible English.
  • The devices don't have pen IDs as with Wacom. Every pen is the same and you can't assign one pen to be a paintbrush and another to be a pencil.
  • Pens are kind of chunky and require a AAA battery, though the battery is supposed to last ~ 1 year.

Now, the good:

  • The tablet just worked when I plugged it in to my windows XP box. It showed up as a generic HID (human interface device), but worked right away. When used in this mode, all pen movement is relative movement, just like your mouse. I.e. the cursor on the screen does not reflect where your pen is on the tablet, but the cursor will follow your pen's relative moves. Installing the driver switches the pen into tablet mode and the cursor is wherever the pen is on the tablet.
  • The tablet control pannel lets you define the region of the tablet that is active using an intuitive 'Click in the upper left corner, now click in the lower right corner' approach similar to callibration of PDAs. This should be good for using screens that don't perfectly match the size of the tablet.
  • It works with Gimp. As I'm just using this for hobby stuff, I don't want to spend gobs of money on software, and I like the Gimp to boot. Pressure sensitivity works great! I had no idea that I would like pressure sensitivity as much as I do, but it's been great! I did need to update to a newer version of the Gimp (2.2.13) and GTK+ (2.10.6-1) as the version I had installed caused my cursor to be stuck at the top of the screen when using the tablet.
  • Cracking open the tablet last night showed that this appears to be very hacker friendly. The insides of the tablet are essentially a very thin flexible circuit board similar to the FFC's. The board contains the RF grid, which is connected via 2 ZIF sockets to a PCB. The board is shielded from behind by a thin piece of sheet metal. Other than that, there is just a single USB cable running out of the box.The board can be disassembled via 9 screws located in the bottom of the board behind rubber footies. There are no hidden clasps. Also, there is quite a bit of empty space inside the enclosure. I'll post more information about the tablet soon.


* Test Tablet Drawing.jpg (8.24 KB, 295x319 - viewed 333 times.)
Logged
keyshi
New Poster
*
Posts: 2


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2006, 01:03:25 AM »

Actually, the price is $99 refurbished with a 1 month warranty. A longer warranty costs additional money.

I also purchased an Aiptek hyperpen 12000U direct from Aiptek and it just arrived last night. So far, I have mixed feelings about it. I've never used a tablet before, so I don't really have anything to compare it to. I, like SchwarzerPrinz, am planning on using my hybrid for fun, so I suppose that the issues aren't a huge deal, but it would be nice if they didn't exist. Here's what I've discovered so far:

  • The software that comes with the tablet is pretty hoakey. The installer and everything around the driver CD seem as though they were written in the late 90's. It just leaves an impression of 'cheap'.
  • The tablet draws straight horizontal and vertical lines, but diagonal lines may have some wiggles in them (see attached image), even when using a non-metalic straight edge.
  • The documentation that comes with the tablet is written in terrible English.
  • The devices don't have pen IDs as with Wacom. Every pen is the same and you can't assign one pen to be a paintbrush and another to be a pencil.
  • Pens are kind of chunky and require a AAA battery, though the battery is supposed to last ~ 1 year.

Now, the good:

  • The tablet just worked when I plugged it in to my windows XP box. It showed up as a generic HID (human interface device), but worked right away. When used in this mode, all pen movement is relative movement, just like your mouse. I.e. the cursor on the screen does not reflect where your pen is on the tablet, but the cursor will follow your pen's relative moves. Installing the driver switches the pen into tablet mode and the cursor is wherever the pen is on the tablet.
  • The tablet control pannel lets you define the region of the tablet that is active using an intuitive 'Click in the upper left corner, now click in the lower right corner' approach similar to callibration of PDAs. This should be good for using screens that don't perfectly match the size of the tablet.
  • It works with Gimp. As I'm just using this for hobby stuff, I don't want to spend gobs of money on software, and I like the Gimp to boot. Pressure sensitivity works great! I had no idea that I would like pressure sensitivity as much as I do, but it's been great! I did need to update to a newer version of the Gimp (2.2.13) and GTK+ (2.10.6-1) as the version I had installed caused my cursor to be stuck at the top of the screen when using the tablet.
  • Cracking open the tablet last night showed that this appears to be very hacker friendly. The insides of the tablet are essentially a very thin flexible circuit board similar to the FFC's. The board contains the RF grid, which is connected via 2 ZIF sockets to a PCB. The board is shielded from behind by a thin piece of sheet metal. Other than that, there is just a single USB cable running out of the box.The board can be disassembled via 9 screws located in the bottom of the board behind rubber footies. There are no hidden clasps. Also, there is quite a bit of empty space inside the enclosure. I'll post more information about the tablet soon.

Thank you, this is more what i was looking for Cheesy Specs are nice, but personal experance is better Cheesy im using it for fun(Although if i enjoy it enough could open a new career path for me Tongue ) Also, im really liking the sound of that price, is that american?(Im in canada, EH?)
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!